Gluten-Free Make-Up Review – Zuzu Luxe from Gabriel Cosmetics Inc

What you may not know about me is that I love make-up. I know this blog has mostly been centered around gluten-free living and I’m excited to start a new video series about gluten-free beauty. When researching different things, I found there are limited resources regarding gluten-free make-up tips and beauty videos. Well, I’m going to change that starting today.

A few months ago, I went through all my make-up and thought I did a great job with finding out what has gluten in it and what didn’t but an incident the other night had me question how well I did in my investigations. While applying my make-up, I got some of my mineralized foundation from MAC cosmetics in my eye and it felt like my eye was going to shrivel up in the socket. It burned for almost an hour and make me look like a creepy villain from a horror film.

Turns out I read the product review online and interpreted it the wrong way!!! The products I’ve been using do contain gluten and my eyeball clearly let me know. It goes to show that you don’t have to eat your make-up for it to negatively affect your body. There are many people who have allergic reactions on their skin from gluten and should avoid all products containing gluten both on their skin and in their body.

So, while we were at Earth Fare shopping for groceries, I decided to check out the make-up offerings and try a couple of new things. They had a couple of small displays of make-up in the health and wellness section which was frustrating for me because I’m used to the candy land of the MAC counter or Sephora but what did I expect from being in a grocery store?

After trying a couple of things, I ended up buying a product called ZUZU Luxe which is actually a brand from Gabriel Cosmetic Inc. I purchased their oil free foundation and concealer. Typically I only use foundation when I am going to an event or out for the night. I’m fortunate that my skin is cooperative (most of the time) so I can get away with using concealer and powder on a daily basis. Needless to say the foundation lasts me quite a long time.

I hope by changing products, these random pimples will stop forming!

The concealer was $16.49 and the oil free liquid foundation was $29.99. I’m used to spending about this much on cosmetics so the price tag didn’t scare me. If you use cheaper products, than this might seem like a splurge.

Now let’s get into the review…

What I loved:

Concealer: The concealer is thick and really covered blemishes and circles around my eyes pretty well. The formula worked well with my dry skin. I always put on a nice lotion before putting on any make-up. Dry skin is the worst for having a flawless complexion. The color also matched my skin tone pretty well. It also blended well into my skin and with the foundation.

Oil Free Foundation: I mean who doesn’t love a good oil free foundation? It went on smooth and even. The consistency of the formula worked great on my face and it felt light and fresh, not heavy like some other make up brands. It made a great canvass for the rest of my make-up for the day. Huge bonus, it stayed on for several hours – intact!

What I didn’t love:

Concealer: I hate the tubes with the little pointed tip applicator on the end. You just know that there is going to be a bunch of product at the end of the tube and for $17, I want to use every single drop in the container. I also found the choices of skin tone colors limiting. There was no guidance at the little make up stand on how to choose a color or what the colors meant. For instance at MAC, NW usually means warmer tones and NC are the cooler tones.

Oil Free Foundation: Again, the choices for skin tone colors are limited and no explanation at the stand on how to pick a shade or what the color letters mean.

I must say I was pleasantly surprised that I loved this make-up so much. I’ve been such a snob my whole life with make-up that I’m scared but excited to start branching out a little. Check out my video on how I applied it and see the difference between my faces.

This is my first Vlog so bear with me! I’m pretty excited about my new beauty room so I will be making this a weekly series of gluten-free beauty! I’m planning to do lots of videos on gluten-free make-up, application and tips for having a Pretty Little Celiac face!

This video was actually the second take because the first one I did, the camera was on the actual camera and not video – so I took a picture instead of a video. The demo was like 8 minutes long before I realized the camera wasn’t on! Whoops. Little bit of a learning curve here.

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The Ignorance about Gluten Free Living.

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Since I started Pretty Little Celiac, I use a RSS feeder to send me articles relating to gluten-free and celiac disease to make sure I stay up to date on current trends and studies, but also to just see what the buzz is in the media. Today I woke up to the usual set of articles about gluten-free living and how the gluten-free “diet” isn’t necessary for most people and others that make it challenging for us to fight the gluten-free battle.

But, one article in particular caught my eye. Titled “Why the Billion-Dollar Gluten-free Industry is Secretly Laughing at All of Us.” I was intrigued. Were these new marketing techniques being used? Are there concerns with labeling I need to know about? Nope. None of these things were even addressed in the article by Dana Baaardsen from iVillage.com

The article started out fine at first talking about celiac and gluten-free popularity and then mentioned a blogger with celiac disease who came out against people eating gluten-free when they don’t have to. But then she went into a few sentences about gluten-free that really upset me. For instance, here is how she ended the article:

Here are some of the more ridiculous gluten-free products we found — mainly because most of them barely had detectable traces of gluten in them to begin with — if at all. Seriously, just eat more veggies:

Ridiculous? Really?

She goes on to identify a few products like sausages, potato chips, fruit snacks, make-up and juice while making outrageous comments like, “you shouldn’t be eating your make up anyway” and “This gluten-free stuff isn’t so hard after all.”

Wait… What? You wrote a 500 word article about gluten-free living, found a few products online that had a “gluten-free” label on them and decided to not only make a mockery about how I (and thousands of others) have to live but that it’s “easy” because you found a few junk food items that had the words “gluten-free” on them?

I am sick and tired of reading articles like this. I am tired of ignorant people writing and saying things when they have no idea what they are talking about.

Gluten-free living is easy? Well guess what Dana, I challenge you to eat gluten-free for 30 consecutive days and see how “easy” it is. Go to parties with your friends and watch them eat and drink while you sit there starving because you can’t have beer or party foods. Go to weddings with your family and eat a Lara bar out of your purse because the only thing to eat at the wedding is filled with breadcrumbs and sauces with gluten. Go to eat where you get poisoned by something that makes you sick for a whole week and disrupts your entire life.

THEN you can write a truthful article about living gluten-free. THEN you might recognize why it’s important to have “gluten-free” labeling on foods so you can easily navigate the grocery store and find things safe for you to eat.

But I guess until then, you CAN have your cake and eat it too.

Rebecca

Comments

  1.  Amy Cox says:

    Are you kidding me? Easy???? Any traces of gluten in ANYTHING makes me sick for weeks! When I found out I had Celiac Disease I was 31 years old. I was mysteriously ill for my entire life before. Hospitalizations, tests, broken bones, organ damage, and even Psych treatment when people could not find what was wrong. I had Osteoporosis from not absorbing Calcium properly in my bones, also all of my teeth are damaged. The Calcium that did not make it to my bones and teeth had collected in the arteries of my kidneys and caused them to almost fail. I have been in terribly painful treatment for the calcification of my kidneys FOR YEARS since. I also had high risk pregnancies and two of the three of my kids have food allergies (no coincidence that kid number three, the one I was gluten free during the pregnancy, is my healthiest with no allergies). This is of course only secondary to the horrid damage to my intestines. I have to work very hard to make sure I absorb vitamins. Eat more veggies? I would LOVE to! I love veggies. Unfortunately when your Gastrointestinal Tract is damaged, raw veggies are not easy to eat. And when you cook them the vitamin content is lowered so you have to eat more. Also, “you shouldn’t be eating your makeup”. Did you pay attention to your Science classes in school??? Read about the skin and how we absorb what we put on it. That sentence alone just shows your unbelievable ignorance. Seriously, basic human anatomy. Pick up a book in the children’s section if the big words confuse you. Read about the intestines and the skin and how we absorb vitamins. Pay special attention to how the intestines are like layers of screens with small holes for vitamins to go into our bodies AND IF INFLAMED…….they don’t. They go to waste and if your kidneys don’t work well…..they stick inside of them. I could go on and on. But the last thing I want to say is, writing an article in an attempt to put down people with a medical condition that you CLEARLY have not even researched is a despicable way to live. And it is one of the biggest problems with this country. Good luck with life! You will attract great people with that kind of attitude! I prefer positive people who offer help and ones who, when they don’t understand something, they don’t assume they do and judge.

     

  2.  Lisa says:

    This makes me insanely mad! She has not a clue what it’s like and people who just eat gf for the fad don’t either! Unless you are one of the people who gets ridiculously sick for a week and have to miss work, school etc you have no idea. When a cute guy buys you a drink at the bar and you have to ask what’s in it because you don’t want to be sick all night and they look at you like a freak. Or when you go to a restaurant and the waitress asks you “gluten what?” Until you have lived the life of a true celiac then you have NO idea how hard it is. And you go ahead and eat vegetables from the time your 15 until you die, then we’ll talk.

     

  3.  McKenna says:

    Thank you for this. I have been recently diagonosed with Celiac. While some of my family has been supportive and understanding, not all have. I am constantly being told that a little won’t hurt me… Although I am new, I am doing fairly well and don’t really want to take chances, I know a slip up will happen from time to time, but I don’t need my family, friends and co-workers thinking a little won’t hurt or that this isn’t really a problem.

     

  4.  Alexandra Berger says:

    Thank you, Rebecca.
    I’ve had celiacs since i was 3, but didn’t really know about it until i was 26, about 4 years ago. fortunately, most people in my life are very supportive of my “diet” and try to accommodate me as best they can. It is so important to have people talking about our side of the story and the struggles we face everyday. Thank you for your work to broaden people’s understanding of eating gluten-free.
    Alex

     

  5.  Suzanne says:

    This is your very best post. Ever. Thank you

     

  6.  jeanne says:

    How is it that a writer who is clearly clueless can get published. Her arogance and lack of knowledge is pathetic. The funny thing is, it seems to me that she inadvertently made a point she didn’t realize she was making….why is it “special” that meat & potato chips & juice needed to be labeled gluten-free? Um, because too many of these products that should be – often aren’t. It’s ridiculous how food manufacturers use wheat/gluten when its not necessary – its in everything (because of its addictive properties perhaps?). This is torture for those of us living with celiac! I don’t buy the gf fad-diet-thing, there is nothing cool about gf lifestyle. But I do believe the over-use of wheat/gluten is unnatural & causing a problem for countless others who are finding they can’t tolerate gluten – or others, like moms I know who are going gluten-free because their kids are suffering with unexplained health conditions that seem to respond to a gf diet (such as eczema, adhd, migraines, other autoimmune disorders, etc).

     

  7.  Dana Baardsen, Author says:

    Hi Rebecca, I’m including a response to your response! I’ve never done that before, but since you have used a corner of your website to address my article, I figured I would do the same to shed some light on these issues. I think it’s important. Thank you.

    http://danaelisebaardsen.com/5/post/2013/03/gluten-free-a-response.html

    Readers: This is a response to an upset blogger who read one of my fad-diet critiques on iVillage.com. She took the time to blog how she felt about my article on her website, so I am taking the time to kindly answer questions she raised and also provide some insight into who I am as a young journalist.

    Hi Rebecca from Pretty Little Celiac,

    Thank you for taking the time to read and respond to my article. I have taken the time to read and respond to yours. I hope you read my response with an open, grudge-free mind, as my writing has really been taken out of context. I know several other readers will take my article out of context as well, so thank you for giving me the opportunity to reply.

    My relationship with celiac disease:

    I do not live gluten-free, nor do I medically have to. I have studied Nutrition and Food Science for four years (this May I obtain my degree) and of course have studied the mechanisms of celiac disease. Not only is it a frustrating lifestyle to adhere to, but also a very serious medical condition. As stated in my article, “Gluten-intolerance (or celiac disease) is a legitimate medical condition and frustrating condition that irritates the small intestine and causes symptoms which range from diarrhea to nutrient malabsorption.” ßThough it is MUCH more than that.

    My response to my article and yours:

    This article posted on iVillage.com was to get people talking about certain studies recently conducted, which brought awareness to the fact that there is a much greater amount of people living gluten-free, compared to the amount of people who are medically diagnosed. In addition, companies may be taking advantage of the fact that there is a market for gluten-free foods.

    When large websites, like iVillage create content, the ideas are run through teams of editors and then assigned to writers, like myself. My content is then filtered through my top editors and then produced onto the website.

    This topic was assigned to me, as was the layout of addressing certain “gluten-free” products, which wouldn’t make sense for a NON-CELIAC to invest in. So of course, for someone who has celiac disease these products are great…but in the context that there are several individuals investing in gluten-free when they don’t necessarily have to, they may need to just make better food choices in general.

    Let me just give you an example of how these things work. I had inserted a line, which read, “So before letting the green flow out of your pocket, let it flow onto your plate (in the form of fresh veggies) and see how your body responds, before investing in a full-fledged gluten-free diet plan.”

    ^This line appeared right before the listing of gluten-free products, which a non-celiac may not benefit from investing in if it’s just processed foods in general which are making them feel down.

    However, one of my top-editors removed that line and inserted: “Here are some of the more ridiculous gluten-free products we found — mainly because most of them barely had detectable traces of gluten in them to begin with — if at all. Seriously, just eat more veggies:”

    I am responsible for this line, as it is under my name and so I am apologizing for the part of your response where you reference this line and include, “But then she went into a few sentences about gluten-free that really upset me.”

    I do not like upsetting anyone. EVER! If you read any blog post directly posted by me…it is always written with knowledge, love, and health in mind. I work with editors who edit like this too! However, especially for media-driven websites, my posts are given a certain personality. My diet-critic posts on iVillage tend to be written with research, but also with opinion, and sarcasm…which is normally turned up a notch (or few) by top-editors. I know it is bound to make people ANGRY.

    For example, I wrote an article regarding a diet, which originated in Britain. While I was brainstorming different words to describe a British individual, the term “Brits” popped into my head. Before I used it, I researched it and found that it can actually be considered racist, so I purposely didn’t include it. However, after the article was filtered through my editors, the term was inserted and there were people commenting how I’m borderline racist. The worst feeling ever!

    I work for iVillage though. If I said writing diet-critiques was my favorite thing to do, I’d be lying! I don’t like to criticize anyone, but I handle the assignment to the best of my ability. For iVillage, I’ve written lovely beauty and health articles, which I treasure… and I also work for iVillage by producing other writer’s content onto the site. I never turn down an assignment they give me, because I value my position there. Overall, iVillage is an amazing resource for women.

    I am sorry you have struggled with celiac disease, and you feel there are OTHER writers out there who ignorantly bash the condition. That’s unfair. You are doing a great service with your website by spreading knowledge about celiac disease.

    As far as your challenge is concerned: I have challenged myself with restricted food-choices, like vegetarianism for one year after eating meat my whole life, but never would I subject myself to gluten-free living if I didn’t have to. I know it’s hard. But believe me, I am a journalist at heart, and if any editor ever asked me to live gluten-free for 30 days and document it, I would! I’ve pitched to do it with a juice-only diet for 30 days over a year ago, but the interest wasn’t high enough. That’s the type of reporting I would really love to do.

    I’ve heard of those with celiac disease who like that gluten-free is gaining awareness, because it offers more food choices for them. I’ve also heard others with celiac disease who can’t stand that the trend has gained popularity because it is making their products more expensive, and restaurants don’t take it as seriously because they just want to fit into the “trend”…so some people feel they are more likely to get sick eating out from contamination.

    One more note I’ve made for you: You addressed my article, “Why the Billion-Dollar Gluten-free Industry is Secretly Laughing at All of Us,” and you continue to share, “I was intrigued. Were these new marketing techniques being used? Are there concerns with labeling I need to know about? Nope. None of these things were even addressed in the article by Dana Baaardsen from iVillage.com”

    The FDA better not be mislabeling gluten-free! If it is labeled gluten-free, it SHOULD be. I have read about factories/companies producing foods with and without gluten within the same factory, but fears of cross-contamination shouldn’t rest within the realms of labeling. That fear, as you know, should stick to eating out at restaurants. (Right now, my labeling fears reside with GMO and the new politics regarding Monsanto…ugh!).

    But to follow up with you, (within the limited time) I was given to write the article, I interviewed a Food Scientist about the cost of gluten-free foods. (This was also cut by my top-editors)

    An excerpt from my first submission:

    Food Scientist, Dr. John Specchio adds, “Costs of gluten-free foods are higher than regular food products because there is a demand for it.” He continues, “If something is popular, there will be a market for it, which is why they can increase the costs on those products. In addition to that, the food product needs to be reformulated, since they are removing the Gluten. There is a lot of research that goes into creating a product which meets public demand… that costs money too.”

    Discussing Dr. Specchio’s insight on gluten-free food pricing, was to draw light to the fact that these foods tend to be pricier…so if you’re not medically diagnosed, why subject yourself to that?

    I can tell by your response, you had written and posted it with frustration and anger, and I never meant to stimulate that reaction within my readers. The least I could do was offer you (and others) a little insight into who I am, where I come from as a human being and freelancer, the possibility that a brain may be floating around somewhere in my skull, and to remind you why these articles are produced in such a way and that a lot of planning and editing actually goes into them.

    What have I done for the gluten-free community?

    Last year, I worked with a pizzeria in New Jersey to use and continue using gluten free pizza crust and offer gluten-free pasta (even though it’s more expensive and the chefs had a hard time because it takes longer to cook than regular pasta!)

    I also run a women’s health newsletter, and we are working on a gluten-free awareness newsletter right now, and I have run gluten-free awareness articles in the past under that newsletter, all authored by a gluten-free writer.

    If I ever do a gluten-free challenge, you will be the first to know.

    With love,

    Dana

     

  8.  Jess says:

    Here is my response to Dana which iVillage would not let me post:
    “You have done a huge disservice to the 6-8% of American with non celiac gluten sensitivity, in addition to the 1% of us who have Celiac Disease. Although you quote the Univ. of Chicago Center for Celiac Disease’s website, there have been several studies in the last 2 yrs showing that the incidence of non celiac gluten sensitivity is higher than 2-3% (check out Dr. Fasano on http://www.pubmed.gov). There are many with gluten sensitivity, who, due to activation of the innate immune system, have severe reactions to traces of gluten (including a few of my own family members). In addition, it was difficult not to take offense to your comment regarding gluten free cosmetics. Any mother of a child with Celiac Disease or gluten sensitivity needs to be extremely careful that her lipstick is gluten free.”
    Jess recently posted…Sun Dogs, Celiac, and GratitudeMy Profile

     

  9.  Becky says:

    The post in iVillage is certainly a Passive Aggressive buck shot to the Gluten-free community. The key identifies are as follows:
    1. Address the intended audience as if you have no clue who they might be
    Title suggests the food industry while the article addresses those with celiac’s disease/ gluten intolerant and those who choose to follow this diet without any medical indication of having this condition. The article’s lack of focus jumps from one view point to another leaving the reader with little information.
    2. Use of anthropomorphism
    “Gluten, the protein-complex mainly found in wheat products, has become a recent villain”
    “deflecting our ailments on to poor ol’ gluten”
    3. Stating the obvious
    “We are not discounting that.” This refers to the legitimate medical condition to which the article gives permission for those inflicted to pursue a gluten-free diet.
    4. Suggest highly improbable consequences
    “When someone cuts out “gluten-containing” foods, they experience feeling cleaner, more energized and healthier…but was it really the gluten that was getting them down?” Yes, it is.
    “You were not really eating sausages if your sausages had gluten in them” I suggest you read the labels of the foods you eat and research the different ways gluten is labeled.
    “You shouldn’t be eating your makeup, anyway.” Gluten in eye makeup causes immediate tears and welts after I’ve accidentally used the wrong brand.
    5. Suggests a solution to the problem that patronizes the reader
    “So why in the world would a non-celiac subject themselves to such torture?” Every medical test I’ve had for celiac’s disease has been negative. Yet, on a gluten-free diet I thrive.
    “people keep getting hoodwinked” You suggest consumers are subject to media hype and can not make decisions for food.
    “Seriously, just eat more veggies”

    If the iVillage editors deleted, substituted segments of your article, then may I suggest you post your original article on your website to clear up any misunderstandings towards you. As it stands, this article is inflammatory aimed to ‘anger’ the audience to which you have agreed to participate.

     

  10.  Becky says:

    The post in iVillage is certainly a Passive Aggressive buck shot to the Gluten-free community. The key identifies are as follows:
    1. Address the intended audience as if you have no clue who they might be
    Title suggests the food industry while the article addresses those with celiac’s disease/ gluten intolerant and those who choose to follow this diet without any medical indication of having this condition. The article’s lack of focus jumps from one view point to another leaving the reader with little information.
    2. Use of anthropomorphism
    “Gluten, the protein-complex mainly found in wheat products, has become a recent villain”
    “deflecting our ailments on to poor ol’ gluten”
    3. Stating the obvious
    “We are not discounting that.” This refers to the legitimate medical condition to which the article gives permission for those inflicted to pursue a gluten-free diet.
    4. Suggest highly improbable consequences
    “When someone cuts out “gluten-containing” foods, they experience feeling cleaner, more energized and healthier…but was it really the gluten that was getting them down?” Yes, it is.
    “You were not really eating sausages if your sausages had gluten in them” I suggest you read the labels of the foods you eat and research the different ways gluten is labeled.
    “You shouldn’t be eating your makeup, anyway.” Gluten in eye makeup causes immediate tears and welts after I’ve accidentally used the wrong brand.
    5. Suggests a solution to the problem that patronizes the reader
    “So why in the world would a non-celiac subject themselves to such torture?” Every medical test I’ve had for celiac’s disease has been negative. Yet, on a gluten-free diet I thrive.
    “people keep getting hoodwinked” You suggest consumers are subject to media hype and can not make decisions for food.
    “Seriously, just eat more veggies”

    If the iVillage editors deleted, substituted segments of your article, then may I suggest you post your original article on your website to clear up any misunderstandings towards you. As it stands, this article is inflammatory aimed to ‘anger’ the audience to which you have agreed to participate.

     

  11.  Dave says:

    Easy-yeah sure . when the family stops at krispy kreme for a few and you just watch or vistiing family in a small town usa. cant really eat out with others must prepare , bring or ???

     

  12.  Alex Kinsella says:

    I do a lot of event planning for my job. Since my diagnosis, I make sure to have the caterers include gluten free food and beverage options – not just for myself, but for other celiacs too. Makes a world of difference.

     

 

 

Migraines and Celiac Disease – Is there a link?

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Migraines and Celiac Disease

I don’t know if you’ve ever been stricken by a migraine but it’s probably one of the absolute worst things your body can do to you. For me the pain starts creeping up my neck and into my temples. I can feel it from the start working its way up into my brain, just waiting for the debilitating pain in a few hours.

Then my vision gets blurred and my head starts to officially pound. I can feel my veins throbbing in my head and neck. Any amount of light makes me nauseous and hurts eyes and my head even more. I’m fortunate that mine usually last about a day, but that day knocks me out for good. I don’t want to see, talk to or hear from anyone. It’s a time of solitude in my bedroom, in the dark.

I don’t get migraines that often but I do get them when I have gluten, which for me is one of the signs I’ve been poisoned. Sometimes I get them around my menstrual cycle but since I had my endometriosis surgery, they haven’t been around like before.

A new study was published in the Headache journal by Dr. Peter Green with new information on not only celiac disease but irritable bowel diseases and their connection to migraines as well. Here’s what they found…

The study included 502 people, 188 with celiac disease, 111 with inflammatory bowel disease, 25 with gluten sensitivity, and 178 who didn’t have any of the conditions. The researchers included clinical, demographic, and dietary information on the people in their survey, as well as questions about headache type and frequency.

Results show that chronic headaches were reported by 30% of the people with celiac disease, 56% of those who were gluten sensitive, 23% of those with inflammatory bowel disease, and 14% of those without the conditions.

The results show an even higher incident of chronic headaches with people who have gluten sensitivity over celiac disease. My biggest question with the results of this study is wondering if those 56% of people with gluten sensitivity continued to eat small amounts of gluten and that could be cause for the high number. At first I wondered about the low celiac disease number, but probably most of those people have tried to completely eliminate gluten from their diets thus resulting in less side effect symptoms like migraines.

Obviously, this was a small study group but the numbers are pretty high for people with bowel diseases and headaches. I think more people need to look into why they get migraines because usually there is a larger issue at hand causing them and taking an ibuprofen is just a band aid on a gaping wound that needs stitches.

My cousin had debilitating headaches until she stopped consuming artificial sweeteners like aspartame and MSG. There was a much larger issue for her causing these problems. The food she consumed affected her ability to function and now with that knowledge she has them way less, if at all anymore. Natural sweeteners such as Stevia are available online from vendors such as Wal-Mart, Swanson Vitamins and PowderCity.

We just need another reminder to stop and think if something is happening repeatedly, out of the norm, our bodies need a check to make sure that there isn’t a larger issue. Migraines and celiac disease are a very real connection but they are also a connection to so many other things!

 

Gluten-Free but Still Getting Sick?

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Are you eating gluten-free but finding yourself still getting sick?

Were you diagnosed with celiac disease but struggling to feel better and get rid of the symptoms?

Well, this is the post for you!

Depending on where you are in your recovery, you will continue to struggle for months even up to 1-2 years after your diagnosis for a variety of different reasons. These are 5 reasons you might still get sick after removing gluten from your diet:

  • You are probably still eating or using products containing gluten. Not by a fault of yours (or maybe so) but you are still getting used to eating gluten-free. This is a process. You can’t cut gluten like you would peanuts so it is much more difficult to avoid in the beginning. Don’t beat yourself up over it! Each time you get sick is a new learning experience. Even people who have been gluten-free for years struggle with hidden gluten at times. Maltodextrin seems to be the ingredient that I miss on labels all the time!
  • Your body is healing. Remember you likely have gone many years with undiagnosed problems associated with gluten and so just by eliminating it is the first part, you need to take the time to allow your body to get back to normal. It has to heal itself and adjust to a whole new (healthy) way of living. You might need to have your blood levels checked to be sure your deficiencies are being covered with supplements.
  • There are other things you are reacting to that once you eliminate gluten you will realize, like lactose. It is very common for celiac to hide other food intolerance or allergies so be careful when blaming getting sick on gluten, it could in fact come from something else.
  • You could have another bowel disease-causing the distress. If eating a dedicate gluten-free diet doesn’t help your stomach symptoms, then you definitely should go back to the doctor and be tested for other diseases like colitis, Chron’s or other bowel disorders.
  • You could have another auto-immune disease-causing problems. For instance, I was suffering from Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis and endometriosis. It took a whole year to figure out all of those things and once they were all dealt with, I started to feel like a whole new person.

If you are eating a dedicated gluten-free diet and your symptoms are not improving, you should seek a doctor’s opinion as to why you aren’t getting better. Unfortunately, there is a small percentage of people who do not get better using a gluten-free lifestyle so it is imperative you seek medical attention.

Another concern with gluten-free is that you have to go cold turkey. Literally, there is no weaning process for gluten removal. You must stop eating it because you will never get better if you do not completely eliminate it from your diet. I’ve written another popular post about why cheating on celiac is a horrible idea, so if you are trying to eat just a little bit of gluten – it’s time to stop.

Gluten is not like lactose. I’m lactose intolerant and can handle a small amount. If you have celiac disease, you can not handle ANY amount of gluten nor should you try to test your body. Just because you don’t physically react to a small amount that you can tell, your body on the inside is in turmoil creating a breeding ground for malignant diseases like cancer!

Finding out you have to eat gluten-free is not the end of the world. There are lots of supportive groups and resources out there for you! If you want to check out our Facebook group – you are more than welcome to join us! It’s primarily women and we are a non spam, non soliciting, self-hosting support group on Facebook.

Comments

  1.  Liz says:

    What a great post! For years doctors were blaming my symptoms on (first I was called a hypochondriac) the genetic condition I have, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome – Hypermobility Type. Only when I had sever vitamin deficiencies did they even consider celiac again and that someone could have more than one thing going on!

    Thanks for posting!
    Liz recently posted…cinnamon St. Patrick’s DayMy Profile

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      I swear we could all write a huge book on the misdiagnosis of celiac disease. Everyone has such different stories with all the same theme. At least you have it sorted out now but I’m sure you would rather of had it many years ago.

       

  2.  Princess Shimari says:

    Hi, Can anyone explain the relationship between endometriosis and Gluten Intolerance. This is the first time that I have heard of an association and I am eager to find out.
    Princess Shimari recently posted…CONSULTATIVE MARKETING My perspective.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      There are very limited studies that link the two but women with celiac disease have a 25% chance of having endometriosis. They all seem to link together especially the infertility concerns.

       

  3.  Cathy says:

    Rebecca, I’m so thankful to have found your blog today, because I am at my wit’s end! I was diagnosed a year ago with celiac – with a bonus diagnosis of collagenous colitis, which I thought would go away as soon as I started eating GF. Nope. It did for a while, but this is the 2nd time in a year that I’ve been able to eat basically nothing for weeks in a row. I’m sick, sick, sick…and SICK of it! So, I’m just glad you’re here with suggestions like looking into lactose intolerance (love milk in my coffee and think yogurt is good for its probiotics) or vitamin/mineral deficiencies. Thank you!! If nothing else, you are a morale-booster that will hold me over till I can figure this all out. : )

     

  4.  Jamie R says:

    Hey Rebecca,

    Thank you for the article. It feels good to know that you are not alone in this battle. That other people have conquered what seems very difficult, and managed to lead healthy lives!

    I don’t want to rant too long, but I feel it is important to get a little bit of detail in to be able to really see the situation.

    I have been ill for a long time (diagnosed at an age of 2, but not being able to clue together the physical and mental problems it brought with it until age of 20+). Can go as far to say I had gluten ataxia (neurological issues: slurred speech, muscle weakness, cognitive difficulties etc), constant anxiety/depression, lots of pain throughout the body, sleepless nights / insomnia etc caused by this and the list goes on.

    I’m now 26 and I’ve been on a strict gluten free diet since sept 2012. I’ve gradually gotten better, started working out and felt my health slowly creep back up. Though as things were progressing nicely I’ve now hit a road block and it feels as if the horse is starting to run backwards, upside down, across the ceiling. I’m confused. I eat “paleo” clean fish, chicken, tuna, eggs, gluten free oats (not sure about this one) veggies, rice and mostly self prepped except tikka marsala sauce which is “gluten-free” (yet again, not sure if it is safe). Also drink some milk, but have taken it on off the diet. Fruit/berries smoothies and tried hemp protein for a while (again, not sure… so I dropped it) . Potatoes gives me the worst stomach pains and so does certain foods. I take fish oil, gluten free vitamin tablets. Working out 2-3 times a week… Was seeing good weight and muscle gains, but now I’m feeling weaker and weaker for every day. Also have a lot of normal allergies, and I’m quite certain they cause reactions throughout my body (such as peanuts) and I eliminated the ones that I could tell wrecked havoc. I’m now at the point where I’m curious what to do. Head back to the hospital for further examination? Play it out and try to eliminate once again?

    So I was wondering if you have any tips on how to approach this as it seems you have gone through the same thing. Would really love your thoughts and any help is greatly appreciated!

    Kind regards,
    Jamie

 

 

Chia Pudding Recipe with only 2 Ingredients!

Chia Pudding Recipe
Chia Pudding Recipe

Did you buy a box of chia seed thinking you would use it, only to get it home and have it sit in your cupboard for a while? Well, that’s exactly what happened to me.

I’ve seen people posting recipes for various ways to make it but I didn’t like some of the ingredients like maple syrup that were being used, so I set out to find an easier way to make it!

This recipe is 2 ingredients, set up quickly and tasted great. You have to like seeds to enjoy this. I love sesame seeds so this is a natural transition into something different but still tasty. My husband added cinnamon to his and he ended up really liking it!

All we did was mix chia seeds with vanilla coconut milk to get the pudding!

So why eat chia seeds? Great question!

  • Turns out they have a great source of Omega 3′s which is important for heart and cholesterol health.
  • It contains protein to keep you feeling fuller and giving you energy to get through your day!
  • They are easy to add to almost anything.
  • The glycemic index of chia seeds is very low so you can eat them without spiking your blood sugar.
  • And they are full of fiber, which helps you feel fuller, faster and can assist in a weight loss program by providing hunger control!!! Who doesn’t love that benefit?

Tell me… How do you chia?

Rebecca

I also go to practice my photography skills with this project and I think it turned out great. I played around with it and used a few separate containers to try to get a great shot. Which one do you prefer, the top or bottom picture? 

 

Chia Pudding
Chia Pudding

Benefits of Kale: The Vegetable Powerhouse

Parmesan Kale Chips
Parmesan Kale Chips

If Beans are considered the “magical fruit,” then Kale is the equivalent in vegetable world. After seeing a lot of information about Kale while I was juicing, I started to see if I could incorporate it more in our daily meals.

Turns out, I’m not a fan of Kale.

Even when I had it in my juice, I couldn’t put too much or else it would ruin my drink.

The taste of kale is pretty tart and sharp, which has always been a taste I stay away from. I’m really more of a sweets girl myself and prefer spinach. But…. there are so many great things about kale that I had to give it another try.

So what are some of the great benefits of kale?

  1. Low calories: Only 35 per cup
  2. Full of fiber: 5g per serving
  3. Filled with nutrients like calcium, vitamin K, vitamin B6, magnesium, vitamin A & C
  4. Bursting with folic acid and other antioxidants
  5. Can easily be made into crisps

Ok, so the last one is a benefit for me really because it’s an easy way for me eat them. I love anything with a crunch.

So, then how do you make my parmesan kale crisps shown above?

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees
  2. Wash the kale thoroughly to get rid of the pesticides and other gross stuff
  3. Cut the spine out of the kale and then further cut the pieces down to bite sized
  4. Get out your olive oil and put the kale in a bowl. Lightly cover the kale in olive oil by mixing in a small amount and using your hands or a spoon to cover the leaves.
  5. Layer the leaves on a cookie sheet and then sprinkle with sea salt. Put in the oven.
  6. Set the timer for 6 minutes. After the first 6 minutes, you want to take them out and sprinkle your parmesan cheese over the crisps then put back in the over for another 5-6 minutes. You want them to be dried out but not burned when you take them out of the oven.
  7. Take out when done and let cool a few minutes. Then enjoy.
  8. They can easily be used with many different types of seasoning like a gluten-free taco or garlic salt.

 

After playing around with these and trying different recipes, I found myself enjoying kale much more than I ever previously thought I would. It turns out what just by changing the cooking method, you can change the entire taste of a food.

How do you eat your kale?

 

Gluten-Free Chick-fil-a Style Chicken Nuggets

Gluten-Free Chick-fil-a Style Nuggets
Gluten-Free Chick-fil-a Style Nuggets

Oh yeah, we went there! I scoured the internet for a few recipes to make Chick-fil-a nuggets and then turned them into my own gluten free delight! Finally that gluten-free flour from Trader Joe’s came in handy. I used to love Chick-fil-a. Every time we went there, I got the same thing – a light lemonade, an 8 piece chicken nugget and a waffle fry. But all that changed after my celiac diagnosis.

Now if you make this recipe, don’t come at me swinging because it doesn’t exactly taste like Chick-fil-a. Sorry, that isn’t going to happen (especially gluten-free). But we did manage to make a comparable one that tasted great and left me wanting more. This also isn’t the healthiest recipe but I’m sure it’s better cooked in your own home, in a controlled environment rather than in a restaurant with who knows what in your food.

If you are interested in Chick-fil-a’s actual gluten-free items – you can find it here.

Gluten-Free Chick-fil-a Style Chicken Nuggets

Ingredients:
3 Free Range Chicken Breasts
3/4 cup of dill pickle juice
1 teaspoon of salt
1 teaspoon of pepper
1 teaspoon of garlic salt
2 Eggs
1 cup of lactose free milk
1 cup of Gluten Free Flour
1/2 cup of Peanut oil
How to cook:
1.Clean chicken and cut chicken into small cubes.
2.Marinate:  combine pickle juice, milk and eggs.  Shake in some salt and pepper or substitute.
Place cubed chicken into marinate and refrigerate for 2-4 hours.
3. Add flour, salt and pepper, garlic salt into plastic bag.  Put cube chicken into bag.  Shake until chicken is covered.  If small bag, you can do this multiple times.
4. Heat peanut oil in frying pan, on medium to medium high.  Wait until oil is hot, and place layer a chicken in the pan.  Heat 3 to 4 minutes on each side.  The longer on each side the crisper the nuggets.
5. Place finished nuggets on paper towel to soak up excess oil.
6. Salt and pepper to taste.

 

Gluten-Free Raspberry Shortcake

Gluten-Free Raspberry Shortcake
Gluten-Free Raspberry Shortcake

I used to love baking cakes and cupcakes! I had all the fancy equipment to decorate and actually was pretty good at decorating cakes. I would make them primarily for friends and family and I even did a wedding cake!

After my diagnosis, I never really got into baking again because I didn’t want to buy all the different flours and things you needed to bake with. I’ve used the Betty Crocker gluten-free cake mix and it turned out great but I just miss the whole process. I’m a perfectionist and I would love being able to make wonderful cakes that people would love!

I forgot I bought a box of gluten-free bisquick a while back and found it in the cupboard. I decided to modify one of their recipes on the box. So, here you have gluten-free raspberry shortcakes!

Gluten-Free Raspberry Shortcakes

Ingredients:
1/2 cup sugar
2 1/3 cup gluten-free bisquick
1/3 cup grasfed butter
3/4 cup lactose free milk
3 eggs
1/2 tablespoon vanilla (make sure it’s gluten-free)
1 tablespoon Allspice
1 tablespoon of cinnamon
3/4 cup of Enjoy life gluten-free chocolate chips
2 cups of raspberries – I used Driscoll’s

Whipped Cream
2 cups of whipping cream
1 tablespoon of vanilla

How to make:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees
  2. In your mixing bowl, add 1/2 cup sugar with the Bisquick.
  3. Then mix in the butter, milk, eggs, vanilla, allspice, cinnamon. Once it is mixed completely, add in the chocolate chips.
  4. Scoop them out into the size of a fist
  5. Bake for 12 minutes
  6. Take out and let cool
  7. Whip the cream into whipped cream! I just put it in my KitchenAid mixer and let it do it’s thing.
  8. Slice the shortcakes in half and filled with whipped cream and berries, top with the same! Voila – they are done and delicious

Gluten-Free Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

Gluten-Free Quinoa Stuffed Peppers
Gluten-Free Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

Gluten-Free Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

Ingredients:

1lb of grass-fed ground beef
1 cup uncooked tricolor quinoa
3 oz Fontina cheese cubed
2 cups of fresh spinach
3 large peppers
1 oz Asiago and Fontina shredded cheese
1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons of coconut oil

How to make it:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees
  2. Start the Quinoa – it should take about 15-20 minutes to cook depending on what brand you buy
  3. Wash and clean out the peppers to make a big empty pepper cup.
  4. Brown the beef with the coconut oil in a skillet. Once it’s almost done, add the spinach in and cover for about 3-4 minutes until the spinach has wilted into the meat. You might want to stir it in so it’s not just sitting on top.
  5. When the quinoa is done, add the Fontina cheese and the beef mix. Get everything melted and into a nice consistency.
  6. Use a casserole or meatloaf dish to put the peppers in. Fill them up with the mixture and put in the oven for about 17 minutes (we like our peppers a little crispy but if you want them soft, you should leave them in longer).
  7. Take them out at the timer and add the shredded cheese on the top of them along with the Parmesan cheese. We are a cheesy household so you can put as much or as little as you would like on the top.
  8. Bake for another 4-5 minutes so the cheese can melt. Take them out and let cool for about 10 minutes.
  9. Enjoy!

Gluten-Free at Panera Bread? The Secret Menu

Panera Bread Secret Menu – Gluten Free
Panera Bread Secret Menu – Gluten Free

My meeting was scheduled today at Panera Bread so I planned to eat something before I got there and then I could just grab a hot tea, but of course I left my food on the counter at my house and ended up wondering what I would do. Eating gluten-free at Panera Bread is extremely challenging and risky!

I’ve eaten at Panera Bread before and typically just have the black bean soup and some kettle chips. It’s pretty much playing a game of Russian Roulette because of the high risk of contamination from the bread crumbs all over the place. I would say if you are extremely sensitive, stay away from Panera.

When I got to the counter, I ordered the soup, only to find out they didn’t have it today. So I asked the lady to see the nutrition menu so I could see what other options I could have. Mainly I was looking for a salad since I wasn’t sure about anything else.

She then directed me to get my own menu from the front door. I explained to her that the nutrition is in a binder behind the counter and not on the menu. Another cashier helped her and was very friendly. While perusing the allergen list for a bit and not finding anything, I almost settled for 2 bags of kettle chips to hold me over. But, what did I notice, something called “Power Steak Lettuce Wraps.” I used to work at Panera and know that sometimes they come out with seasonal items so I asked if they had that. The girl said “Oh yeah, it’s on our secret menu.” Really? I’ve never heard of it.

After ordering the gluten-free meal, the lady asked me if I wanted a pastry or dessert to go with my meal. AND THEN came around while I was eating and offered me a bite of the pastry they were sampling for the day. I mean seriously folks, get it together!

Wait, actually one of our members at Bexa Body Fitness mentioned that they had this secret menu but I didn’t have time to look to see what is on it. Needless to say I was pretty excited. Most of the items on this menu are full of protein and veggies with limited or no carbs. Here is what is on the menu:

1. Power Breakfast Egg White Bowl with Roasted Turkey
2. Power Breakfast Egg Bowl with Steak
3. Power Mediterranean Chicken Salad
4. Power Mediterranean Roasted Turkey Salad
5. Power Chicken Hummus Bowl
6. Power Steak Lettuce Wraps

photo-1-300x225

Again, I can’t emphasize this enough that there is a high chance of cross contamination at Panera and you run the risk of young teens handling your food and maybe not being as careful as they should when preparing your meal. BUT, I will say this was the best meal I’ve had at Panera in a long time. It was fantastic. The steak was tender and juicy, everything was fresh and I really enjoyed the light, refreshing meal.

Secret menus seem to be the trend and it’s no wonder why Panera jumped on board. I just wish that eating healthy wasn’t a secret and they would post these items on their regular menu for people to order from. This goes right into my post from yesterday about eating clean being a dirty concept. Why on earth are the amazing, fresh and delicious items on the “secret menu.”