8 Gluten Free & Celiac Disease Myths Debunked

myths-debunked

Last month, I attended the International Celiac Disease Symposium and am just now getting around to blogging about my journey for the last few weeks. After leaving ICDS, I flew straight to Baltimore and attended Natural Products Expo East. As soon as I got home, I packed our entire house and prepared my staff and business for my relocation to Northern Virginia!

We moved into our new apartment this weekend, my husband started his new job yesterday and I finally feel like I’m getting settled. The home-sickness is wearing off and I’m exploring the area more and more each day. But, in the meantime I owe you all about 10 blog posts!

Let’s get cranking with debunking gluten myths!

The ICDS 2013 was filled with speakers from all over the world who are medical professionals and experts on celiac disease. They discussed the current research and gave us the down low on all things gluten-free and celiac disease. One of the most exciting segments of the conference was “debunking the myths.” Finally, some answers to age-old questions that I am asked frequently with answers straight from the doctor’s mouth!

  1. Can you drink coffee on a gluten-free diet? Is there a protein in coffee that can cross react with gluten?
    1. Answer: Yes! You can enjoy your coffee. In fact, the coffee flowed everywhere during this conference. Could you have another, separate problem with coffee or caffeine? Yes! But, it is not linked with gluten or celiac as a cross reactive food.
  1. Can you diagnose celiac disease with just a blood test?
    1. Answer: No. Absolutely Not. Diagnosis requires much more than a blood test. See my earlier blog post on the 4 of 5 tests needing completed to confirm a diagnosis. If someone diagnoses you based on a blood test, find a new doctor.
  1. Corn? Can you eat corn while living a gluten-free diet? Is corn protein harmful for individuals with celiac or non celiac gluten sensitivity?
    1. Answer: Enjoy your corn. Dr. Fasano said, “There is absolutely no proof, no evidence that corn is harmful.” Again, could you have separate issues with corn? Yes.
  1. How common is non celiac gluten sensitivity?
    1. Answer: The doctors have no clue. Very new diagnosis and still in the learning phase.
  1. Has there been a gene linked to non celiac gluten sensitivity?
    1. Answer: No. Only for celiac disease.
  1. Are pills like Gluten Ease or other gluten enzyme pills found at health stores and pharmacies okay to take?
    1. Answer: Absolutely not. Never. There is never ever ever a reason to take these enzymes. They are totally unjustified by the lack of evidence. Nothing on the market helps digest gluten. There are products in the works.
  1. Is gluten making you fat?
    1. Answer: No. As a matter of fact, people it’s been found that the more wheat you eat, the less fat you are. (for those of us living with the ability to digest gluten)
  1. Is a gluten-free diet making me fat?
    1. Answer: Depends on what you are eating and how much. 40% of people are overweight at the time of their celiac diagnosis. Patients tend to gain weight after celiac diagnosis based on better absorption of food. Essential to work with a healthcare team, which includes a dietician to create a health and wellness plan for after diagnosis. Stick with whole foods.

All of this information was presented by medical doctors. I am just passing along the information that was giving at the International Celiac Disease Symposium! I hope this is helpful to you and your journey with gluten-free living and celiac disease.

Coping with Celiac Disease: A Therapist’s Perspective (Podcast)

Coping with Celiac Disease: A Therapist’s Perspective

When I was first diagnosed with this disease, I didn’t understand it and struggled to figure it out. Some of you are there now and are looking for help or some of you think you have it figured out but maybe just need to hear something new. I invited Jummy Olawale on my show to talk about the most common struggles associated with celiac disease ( besides the food!).

I’m so glad I decided to do this. Her insight is poignant and dynamic. She really gives inspiration and hope along with tips and suggestions for dealing with this disease. She’s doesn’t have celiac and isn’t a specialist in the disease but really can provide some help for those of us needing help. If you feel out of control or like you lost your footing, this is the perfect place to start.

Here’s a little snippet of what we discuss on the show:

1. What are some coping skills to use when someone goes through a major life change like celiac disease? When everything in your life as you know it, changes in an instant? How do you handle the sense of feeling alone and like a hypochondriac because no one else understands the complexity or the seriousness of the disease?
2. What are some coping skills for handling all these emotions? Sometimes we can have other life issues going on and this is just a huge burden on top of the lemons life throws at us. Especially when you have a bad day and just want to go home, order a pizza and lay around all night.
3. What’s the best way to explain a disease like this to husbands, family, kids and friends? How do you get them on board with helping you instead of constantly minimizing the disease and asking you to just “try a bite because it won’t kill you.”
4. How do you handle the disappointment when family and friends (or your spouse) doesn’t sympathize and isn’t as supportive as you think they should?
5. Marital problems – Handling a non-supportive spouse – what do you do? When your spouse is the only one that understands, how do you find other outlets to cope instead of stressing them all the time.
6. Changing you mindset of food being pleasurable and instead of thinking about it as fuel. People get so upset that they have to eliminate all the things they love that are poisoning them. When they get poisoned, they beat themselves up and get mad at their bodies for betraying them.

On The Air with Pretty Little Celiac is also on iTunes! You can just search “Pretty Little Celiac” and subscribe to it and all the episodes will feed right into your player!

Want to know more about Jummy Olawale?

Jummy Olawale is a dynamic speaker, life coach, Licensed Professional Counselor, Pastoral Counselor and Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor with extensive international and multicultural life experience and education.
Biography

Jummy was born in Nigeria, Western Africa where she lived and attended elementary and secondary school. She migrated to London, England where she completed her High school and college education. She earned her Bachelor of Arts (BA.) degree in Psychology and Natural Science from Canterbury Christ Church University College, Kent. After getting married, she migrated to the U.S. where she now lives with her husband and their two children. Jummy earned her Masters of Arts (MA.) degree in Counseling Ministries from Methodist Theological School in Ohio.

Jummy utilizes narrative therapy, cognitive behavior therapy and motivational interviewing approaches. She specializes in individual, couples, and marriage therapy, multicultural counseling, parenting support, career coaching and life coaching.