YOU are the only person in control of YOUR health!

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I recently heard a story about someone who felt she “owed” it to her family to eat normal for a meal during a celebration event and this made me incredibly sad.

Is it because our medicine is food that makes it so hard for people to follow a strict gluten-free diet? Is it because we associate food as something our bodies need and really can’t understand how consuming gluten with celiac disease impacts our health now and in the future? Is it because for some of us the negative effects aren’t immediate like anaphylaxis so we treat it with less seriousness?

If your family member had lung cancer, would you expect them to go to a cigar club with you for your birthday?

No?

Well, then why would we expect someone with celiac disease to indulge in a piece of cake for a birthday?

Our society and culture is so wrapped around food, making it difficult for us to eliminate gluten because we feel our social lives are taken from us or our ability to have fun with friends. The crazy thing about living gluten-free is that it only confines us if we give it permission to do so. Gluten-Free is challenging and so is staying safe, but I’ll preach it over and over and over that with careful planning, a successful gluten-free life can happen. I live a full, happy, busy gluten-free life because I spent the time learning where and what my body loves to eat. I know what to order at even the scariest restaurants but still keep my fingers crossed knowing I did the best I could with the situation at hand. And, very rarely have I had a problem. Usually it’s when I let my guard down that I get glutened.

It is entirely possible training for a fitness competition and dealing with the negative and rude comments from people about what I ate during those times prepped me for the ignorance of people I meet now while living gluten-free. But, in all honesty, I don’t really care what people say about my eating habits because I’ve NEVER. FELT. BETTER. That’s really all our friends and family should be concerned about when it comes to our health. The foods I consume are healthy and not slowly killing me so where’s the problem?

At some point, you need to accept that others opinions don’t really matter. As long as you are educated about your disease, following the guidelines and living a happy life – that’s what is important. For me, I’m not asking anyone else to live gluten-free. I don’t promote gluten-free for people who don’t need it and I don’t go on and on about my problems unless someone asks me. Don’t get me wrong, I love educating others about my disease and gluten-free living and I’m a huge big mouth advocate too! But I know what I can eat, where I can eat and how to order – which makes all the difference in the world when it comes to staying safe.

But I can tell you that I would never, ever risk my life to feel normal. And you shouldn’t either! I’m the only one that will suffer the consequences and frankly there aren’t any gluten filled foods worth being sick again. (A really hot soft pretzel is very tempting at times though, after all I am human!) Check out an older post of my about why cheating on celiac is a horrible idea.

Bottom line is this… You don’t OWE anyone, anything when it comes to YOUR health.

One of my favorite quotes is by Eleanor Roosevelt –

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

Getting Started with Celiac Disease: Podcast

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On The Air with Pretty Little Celiac Getting Started with Celiac Disease

My newest podcast from this week is up and ready to go! I cover the basics of getting started with celiac disease. Basically all the things you need to know after you leave the doctor’s office.

Were you recently diagnosed with celiac disease? Are you struggling with what to do after you left the doctor’s office?

This podcast is for you.

I cover what to expect after your diagnosis including:

1. Emotions you will feel

2. Tips to get through everything

3. A get started guide on living gluten-free

4. Major changes in your life that need to happen for you to be successful

Please leave feedback! I’d love to hear it. 

Coping with Celiac Disease: A Therapist’s Perspective (Podcast)

Coping with Celiac Disease: A Therapist’s Perspective

When I was first diagnosed with this disease, I didn’t understand it and struggled to figure it out. Some of you are there now and are looking for help or some of you think you have it figured out but maybe just need to hear something new. I invited Jummy Olawale on my show to talk about the most common struggles associated with celiac disease ( besides the food!).

I’m so glad I decided to do this. Her insight is poignant and dynamic. She really gives inspiration and hope along with tips and suggestions for dealing with this disease. She’s doesn’t have celiac and isn’t a specialist in the disease but really can provide some help for those of us needing help. If you feel out of control or like you lost your footing, this is the perfect place to start.

Here’s a little snippet of what we discuss on the show:

1. What are some coping skills to use when someone goes through a major life change like celiac disease? When everything in your life as you know it, changes in an instant? How do you handle the sense of feeling alone and like a hypochondriac because no one else understands the complexity or the seriousness of the disease?
2. What are some coping skills for handling all these emotions? Sometimes we can have other life issues going on and this is just a huge burden on top of the lemons life throws at us. Especially when you have a bad day and just want to go home, order a pizza and lay around all night.
3. What’s the best way to explain a disease like this to husbands, family, kids and friends? How do you get them on board with helping you instead of constantly minimizing the disease and asking you to just “try a bite because it won’t kill you.”
4. How do you handle the disappointment when family and friends (or your spouse) doesn’t sympathize and isn’t as supportive as you think they should?
5. Marital problems – Handling a non-supportive spouse – what do you do? When your spouse is the only one that understands, how do you find other outlets to cope instead of stressing them all the time.
6. Changing you mindset of food being pleasurable and instead of thinking about it as fuel. People get so upset that they have to eliminate all the things they love that are poisoning them. When they get poisoned, they beat themselves up and get mad at their bodies for betraying them.

On The Air with Pretty Little Celiac is also on iTunes! You can just search “Pretty Little Celiac” and subscribe to it and all the episodes will feed right into your player!

Want to know more about Jummy Olawale?

Jummy Olawale is a dynamic speaker, life coach, Licensed Professional Counselor, Pastoral Counselor and Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor with extensive international and multicultural life experience and education.
Biography

Jummy was born in Nigeria, Western Africa where she lived and attended elementary and secondary school. She migrated to London, England where she completed her High school and college education. She earned her Bachelor of Arts (BA.) degree in Psychology and Natural Science from Canterbury Christ Church University College, Kent. After getting married, she migrated to the U.S. where she now lives with her husband and their two children. Jummy earned her Masters of Arts (MA.) degree in Counseling Ministries from Methodist Theological School in Ohio.

Jummy utilizes narrative therapy, cognitive behavior therapy and motivational interviewing approaches. She specializes in individual, couples, and marriage therapy, multicultural counseling, parenting support, career coaching and life coaching.

 

The Connection between Green and Celiac Awareness

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Our Body: Is it just one big garden?

It’s funny how time flies and things can change in just a year. Last year around this time, I found myself really starting to struggle with celiac disease. I opened my new business a week after my diagnosis and didn’t really have time to process it or deal with the emotions that come along with a life changing event. I ate the same things over and over because they didn’t upset my stomach and I didn’t have time to find new things to try. The the business started to slow and I didn’t have to spend as much time up there. I’ll admit the slowing of the business probably contributed to my summer depression, just as much as celiac disease.

When I moved into my boyfriend (now husband’s) home 7 years ago, I couldn’t wait to start planting flowers. Ever year I wanted to try a new plant, dig up a new section of our yard and have a beautiful place to call our home. It started with roses. I built this huge rose garden in our yard. At one point, I think I had 17 rose bushes throughout our yard. They were gorgeous… until the beetles came. I did everything I could to try to contain them from eating my flowers but there were too many of them. I found myself outside each night trying to save my precious flowers from these creatures. I tried everything but eventually the beetles won.

I kept only a few roses that I thought I could save but ended up moving on to different plants with better tolerance.

Turns out I made the right decision. I have gorgeous hydrangeas in my backyard that keep growing bigger and better with each year. They love where they are and despite my neglect last summer, they are coming back this year!

My grandmother loved her roses and she had a few in our backyard growing up. I loved them. The very first plant I bought for our backyard was a peace rose and the last rose in my garden is the same rose-bush. Last year was the first year I didn’t tend to it and I’m not sure if it’s going to come back this year. Which makes me sad but also makes me think about our bodies and the cycles of life.

While I was outside pulling weeds, trimming my lavender and cleaning up our flower beds. I looked down at my hand for some reason when I pulled some grass growing under my flowers and noticed my celiac awareness bracelet is also green just like the foliage around me. Spring brings out all the new growth on flowers and trees and of course it got me thinking!

Green is the perfect color for celiac awareness. I’m not sure who thought of it, but it actually is the perfect and symbolic color for our bodies. Isn’t our body just one big perennial garden? Think about it….

Each year our bodies change depending on how well we are nurtured. Gluten are those little beetles that kept coming back to destroy a little bit of my body year after year. It wasn’t until I realized what was causing my perennial garden harm, made adjustments that all the other flowers started to blossom. Once I removed gluten, my mental health improved, my hair and nails are stronger and thicker, my stomach is healing and a million other improvements have been made.

Last year I struggled tremendously with depression throughout the summer. I remember laying on the couch and looking at the beautiful sun shining wondering why I just couldn’t get up and tend to my garden. Looking back, I realize I was actually talking about myself.

I’m excited to finally feel better and breathe the fresh spring air again. I’m thrilled to feel the joy of tending to my flowers and taking care of my home. It’s taken me a long time to get here. A celiac diagnosis or even having to go gluten-free is a major life change. I can’t emphasize this enough that it’s a marathon, not a sprint. You won’t figure it out right away but that’s okay. Sometimes trial and error makes the learning more painful but quicker. I can tell you after a gluten poisoning attack, I’m quick to learn that lesson for the future!

Think of your body as a perennial garden. It needs watered, pruned, fertilized, fed and sun to make the perfect condition for beautiful growth. The same is true for the human body. The more time you spend now taking care of your body, the easier it will be as we get older.

 

Listen to my first Pretty Little Celiac podcast episode!!!

If you have celiac disease or are living gluten-free, you know how tough it can be emotionally in your life. From food choices to random health ailments, this can be one of the most difficult times of your life. Let me guide you though this challenging component with stories of my own struggles and a question and answer session with you!

I’ve struggled with anxiety, depression and sadness which I’ve been blogging about for a while now. It’s time to take it a step further and engage with everyone on a more personal level.

I can help you make the transition to a happy gluten-free lifestyle.

Do you suffer from Celiac Sadness?

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If you have celiac disease or think you have celiac disease, you can’t help but go through denial at some point in this journey. For me, it was both before I was diagnosed when I had a million different health issues and then about 6 months post diagnosis when it really hit me what this meant.

In a quick internet search on denial, of course Wikipedia was the top search result but it also was the thing that hit home the most – specifically the term abnegation:

Denial, in ordinary English usage, is asserting that a statement or allegation is not true.[1] The same word, and also abnegation, is used for a psychologicaldefense mechanism postulated by Sigmund Freud, in which a person is faced with a fact that is too uncomfortable to accept and rejects it instead, insisting that it is not true despite what may be overwhelming evidence.

Turns out, it wasn’t denial after all. It was abnegation.

I’ve never heard of this term before but man does it hit the nail on the head. Let me explain…

You see there was always a suspicion in the back of my mind that I might have celiac after a coworker was diagnosed who was having the exact same symptoms as me. I didn’t want to have celiac and I didn’t believe that was the case. I said things to myself like “it’s such a rare disease” or “but I don’t get sick when I eat bread.” She repeatedly would tell me I should go and get tested but I never did.  I didn’t want to.

There I was going from doctor to doctor trying to find an answer. Trying to figure out what was wrong with me. Continuing to hear from my friends and family that I was a “hypochondriac” or “always had something wrong with me.” The answer was right in front of me for years, yet I didn’t want to believe it.

The first few months after diagnosis were a struggle. I ate the same foods every day because I knew they were safe but I was so busy opening my business that it worked out well that way for a few months. But after the shock of diagnosis ended and my business calmed down a little, the denial and abnegation reared its ugly head again.

It really hit home for me that I would never eat the foods I loved ever again.

That I could never eat a delicious piece of sourdough bread at my favorite restaurant.

That I wouldn’t be able to grab a bite to eat just anywhere anymore.

That I couldn’t enjoy foods with friends the way it used to be.

That eating fruit and cheese at weddings was my new reality.

That celiac was my new reality.

I was sad, angry, anxious, depressed and in denial.

Maybe I didn’t have this life long disease. It was a wrong diagnosis. I should find another doctor and get a second opinion. maybe I could have gluten a little bit, every once in a while. Maybe I could just do what I’ve always been doing and hope for the best in the long run.

Yup, all of these thoughts ran through my mind. I was sad for about 2 months. I’m lying – I was depressed. July and August of 2012 were just awful for me. I started blogging September 1st and after starting to find all of you online, that’s when I realized I wasn’t alone and my life wasn’t over. I could turn this into something positive and wonderful.

I want you to know it is totally ok to go through these emotions and have these feelings. A few weeks or months is ok, if you are finding it lasting longer than this, it is ok to seek professional help to get over the celiac sadness. <– This is a real thing. It never really goes away.

Celiac Sadness: The temporary feeling of sadness when you encounter any of these scenarios:

  1. You get glutened.
  2. You realize at a social event there is nothing for you to eat.
  3. You make an awesome recipe only to find out it’s disgusting and you spent $75 on ingredients.
  4. You get upset when you see someone make fun or mock gluten-free anything.
  5. You go to dinner with a friend and they constantly make comments about how you order, what you are eating or how delicious their own meal tastes.
  6. You hit your third grocery store to get all the brands of gluten-free foods you enjoy.
  7. You are on a road trip looking for a Wendy’s or Outback Steakhouse but settle for almonds and a bag of kettle chips at the gas station.
  8. You get angry when another dumb ass celebrity says they are going “gluten-free to be more healthy.”
  9. You realize how many years you spent sick because our medical doctors aren’t properly educated on celiac disease.
  10. You finally come to terms with yourself that this is your life now, you can never go back and you will be okay.

Do you ever have Celiac Sadness? Post below!!

Rebecca

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Disordered Eating & Celiac – The post every Gluten Free or Celiac Woman should read….

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Lately I’ve been feeling chained to living a gluten free lifestyle. It’s like a giant, shackled ball is on my ankle following me around everywhere. Even before I started blogging about Celiac and gluten free living, it has been all I think about. Any symptom I have, I wonder if I ate something with gluten. Anytime we go anywhere, I wonder if I can trust the place we are eating to not make me ill. I’m finding myself obsessed with food, obsessed with Celiac…

Not to mention, I feel like a huge burden to others. We just went to a cookout on Friday and they called to see what we wanted to eat. Aaron had to do the whole explanation thing of what I can eat, it’s not just wheat etc…

I ended up eating before we went over there and picking up a fruit bowl to take with some Woodchuck Cider Ale so I wouldn’t be tempted with snacks or be hungry the whole night.

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I realize there are people with bigger problems than I have right now, but for me this is a huge hill I’m still learning to climb. My choices are so limited and I’m already a picky eater so it makes it even more difficult for me to find foods to enjoy. Between the gluten allergy, latex allergy and lactose intolerance problems – I’m struggling. Even more so than I ever have in the past and I think it’s because I’ve become more aware, more diligent of my problems. Specifically now that I’ve been diagnosed with these ailments and know what’s going on.

I’m one of those people that have to understand everything. My friend Janine always jokes with me (and gets annoyed I’m sure) because I ask her “why” all the time. I’m the kid that loved to learn. My grandfather used to teach me lessons on the drive to school and always made sure I was ahead of my grade with reading, writing and arithmetic! So, why can’t I figure this thing out??

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My pop with all our pets growing up – What ugly wallpaper!!

Did you know that 3 out of 4 women suffer from disordered eating in one way or another? That was a study done in 2008…. Can you imagine what the statistics are now with social media growing so large – giving access to so much information to so many people?

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What is Disordered Eating?

Disordered eating is a classification (within DSM-IV-TR, used in the health-care field) to describe a wide range of irregular eating behaviors that do not warrant a diagnosis of a specific eating disorder such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. Affected people may be diagnosed with an eating disorder not otherwise specified. A change in eating patterns can also be caused by other mental disorders (e.g. clinical depression), or by factors that are generally considered to be unrelated to mental disorders (e.g. extreme homesickness).”

According to a 2008 study at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, those in their 30s and 40s report disordered eating at virtually the same rates. Findings show that:

  • 75 percent of women report disordered eating behaviors or symptoms consistent with eating disorders; so three out of four have an unhealthy relationship with food or their bodies
  • 67 percent of women (excluding those with actual eating disorders) are trying to lose weight
  • 53 percent of dieters are already at a healthy weight and are still trying to lose weight
  • 39 percent of women say concerns about what they eat or weigh interfere with their happiness
  • 37 percent regularly skip meals to try to lose weight
  • 27 percent would be “extremely upset” if they gained just five pounds
  • 26 percent cut out entire food groups
  • 16 percent have dieted on 1,000 calories a day or fewer
  • 13 percent smoke to lose weight
  • 12 percent often eat when they’re not hungry; 49 percent sometimes do

Everything I learned about nutrition for the past 4 years is wrong.

All the tools I used to lose weight, probably made me even more ill and could potentially cause numerous problems with me as I get older.

Awesome.

A Penn State University study found that women with controlled celiac disease, eating a gluten free diet – are still more likely to suffer from stress, disordered eating and depression.

As a fitness expert, the more I learn about wheat, gluten and GMO’s I question how I can still promote and recommend these items to my clients.

My hormones are so out of whack that I try to work my ass off – only to build NO lean muscle – just gain weight or stay the same. I never understood why I did everything “right” and it didn’t work. Well, my TSH levels were off the chart, I suffered from low testosterone levels and I consumed gluten at an extra-ordinary rate! No wonder I didn’t feel well despite being “healthy.”

You can imagine how frustrating this is for a fitness professional to try so hard and not get the body the others have. To obsess over what you are putting in your mouth, doing the right things, only to have your body rebel. It’s the same feeling to have a hair dresser with horrible hair or a foot model with warts!

Now my body is running the show and I have no control. I finally know what is wrong but there is still this part of me that still feels like this is temporary and I will be able to go back to eating regular foods anytime now.

I work about 10-12 hours/day 6-7 days per week and I don’t have time or want to learn new recipes or foods. I want things to be quick and simple. I’m fortunate to have a husband that doesn’t mind cooking, but often I feel guilty when he works the same as I do and then ends up cooking.

Today I realized I’ve developed a Disordered Eating habit. I’m only eating things that are quick and easy. I’m not getting enough protein and whole foods in my diet. I’m consuming too many snacky type foods. To put this in perspective and be totally honest – I ate a half a bag of Popcorners, 3 gluten free cookies, 2 gluten free soft pretzels, a gluten free cider ale and some Kefir smoothie with my vitamins. I’m self admitting here, hoping it will wake me up or you can give me some support to lift my head up and eat some meat!

There is a difference between happy and healthy or skinny. I’d much rather be happy and healthy but am struggling to put the pieces together.

I will figure this out….

Last night I had a great balanced meal! Salmon, green beans and purple jasmine rice!! I need to stay committed to these types of meals and eat them throughout the day instead of just dinner.

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Am I crazy? Do you suffer from any of these? Leave me a comment and let me know!!

Comments

 

  • Tric says:

    I definately can relate. Thanks for sharing. On top of my gluten allergy I have an allergy to soy and to corn as well, so my options are very limited. On top of all this, I also have muscle troubles due to years of detected/diagnosed malnutrition and I am gaining weight at a substantial rate which only manifests that problem. I am constantly injured and as a result easy meals are my go-to option for me. I attempt to eat healthy but I often go to snack foods because there is little or no preparing involved. I sometimes want to just throw my hands up in that air and quit. I will admit that there are times where I just opt to suffer and eat what I know might contain gluten somedays, especially when I am at a praty. I take a benadryl and pray when it comes to my soy and corn allergies, because well, let’s face it , it’s hard to find easy foods to eat, besides fruits and vegetables that don’t contain either. I feel your struggle.

     

    • PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Tric-

      Thanks for posting. I completely understand where you are coming from. It’s just so easy to grab a “gluten free” snack instead of eating regular foods. Do you find the benadryl works for you? I’ve never tried it after I’ve been poisoned. My joints get so sore I can’t even bend them!

      Rebecca

       

  • Sarah Casebolt says:

    I empathize and get what you all mean! I tend to opt for snack type foods lately for fear of messing myself up or at times I am so sick I cannot eat at all. It comes in waves I have noticed, that for a few weeks/months I am good then BAM! I am out of commission from who knows what. I buy all organic veggies and fruit not to mention all Gluten Free-everything! It is tiring trying to find a restaurant to go out to so sadly I decline invitations, I eat before I go to a friends or a work function for fear of getting sick. Simply put Gluten and fear run my life, not to mention other areas such as lack of thyroid and tons of steroidal medications that “help” you gain weight. I use that term with a bunch of sarcasm, I am scared to eat, I eat simple things, my diet is boring to me, and I am oveweight-at least for my 5’2 frame. Sadly I am at a loss ladies but I find peace and solice in that we are NOT alone. This is a disease that is getting alot of spotlight, but there are also those negative nancy types that state this is a “diet fad!” Thank you for the information, and I think I have eating disorders for fear of eating the wrong thing. Eeek!

    Sarah

     

  • Brenda Bourelle says:

    Rebecca

    Thank you for sharing and for all the research, I too find living gluten free challenging and know I often make less than ideal food choices. Choosing the same foods day after day (breakfast -yogurt & Udi’s granola; lunch -pbj or protein drink ) and then having little to no energy to cook after a full day at work.
    On the subject of pain, i was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia more than 10 years ago and Celiac approximately 3 years ago. I read in a book about Celiac Disease (don’t recall the source) that sometimes people with Fibromyalgia who eat a gluten free diet sometimes have less pain. This is not true for me, but allegedly it is true for some.

    I’ve only recently found your blog and want to say Thank you for sharing.

    Brenda

     

  • Victoria Rutigliano says:

    Thanks for posting. I have been at this a long time. So… I know how frustrating it can be. I still get mad when I hear about my friends going out for pizza. I am so lucky that I live with a suppoting Partner that is an amazing cook. He creates wonderful meals for me so I don’t feel deprived. I still get mad at times. I am all Italian, so most of the food I grew up with are completely off limits. I was also allergic to lactose, but as I got older it went away. It is so important for a person with Celiac to eat balanced meals. What seems to work for me is cooking in advance and having variety. I also work out a lot and I have to make sure that i have food ready to eat so I don’t grab things that will make me sick. I don’t eat any gluten free snack foods. The sugar really gives me stomach issues. I have been eating mostly like a “cave man”…meat, eggs, veggies, sweet potato, nuts. Seems to be working well. I am completely symptom free. I learned the hard way that trying to go back and cheat a little with gluten is just going to amle me feel like crap. I still get mad when I am at a restaurant with friends and I get passed the bread basket….but I just let it go. I often say to my Partner, “Mark”, that in my next life… I will be eating pizza every day ! lol.. I know it is hard…. all of us on your site are grateful for your posts. It is great to share ideas and thought.

     

  • Melissa says:

    Your thoughts and feelings and the way you express them, it is like I am reading a story I wrote. I have always been a picky eater but LOVED to eat the foods I liked. I was diagnosed with Celiac last month and everything has changed. I HATE food. I am terrified of it actually. I love the morning because I can get through it without eating. I have a couple cups of coffee and go on about my business; this is not a whole lot different than before. By lunch, I am hungry but feel good. I know I have to eat so I do but I hate it because the “feel good” is gone. I am furious about this whole thing, absolutely furious. I do try to find gratitude; this IS fixable but it seems like such a massive mountain to climb. I will say, if I have to hear from anyone (ever again), “Oh, celiac? Thats not a big deal, just a diet change,” I will literally scream. I am trying to believe that this will get better and that food and my stomach will not always hate each other but it is difficult. Thank you for sharing your journey.

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Hi Melissa-

      I know exactly what you mean about being furious. I just keep saying to myself, it will get easier. And it has in many ways. I wish I loved to cook and could try all these yummy recipes I see other gluten free bloggers trying. I even thought about doing it once a month or a week but that dream fades quickly.

      We can get through this! I have no shyness about sharing all my thoughts and problems with everyone so we all know we aren’t alone on this journey. I’ve found things I like that I eat all the time, it just gets boring!

      Welcome to the PLC community!

      Rebecca

       

  •  Jen says:

    I’m recently diagnosed gluten, egg yolk, spinach, almond and cashew intolerant. I’m still mad at the world most days. Why me? I eat healthy, I exercise, I lost the weight, and I got sick anyway. I have been on a restricted diet (no carbs for almost 6 weeks now, no allergy foods for the last three). I can usually find GF foods, but try finding them with no gluten or no egg. No gluten + no egg = no pizza restaurants and very few spaghetti places! It’s frustrating to go out for date night and have it be a disaster because the waitress doesn’t have a clue what a food allergy is. I guess in some respects I’m luckier than most, I don’t get physically ill from consuming allergen foods. My body just couldn’t process the carbs and I gained 40 lbs. I was also vitamin deficient. There is no warning, no clue if I have ingested a banned substance, so I don’t have as much pressure to be super careful at restaurants. I just do the best I can, ask for an allergen menu, and make a wise choice. Alternatively, if I use a product with gluten or almond oil like makeup or hair care, I itch like none other. I’m tired of trying one product at a time and then waiting to see if I have a reaction or not. Even some products that do not have allergens in them, I still can’t use. So, I’ve gone from high maintenance to no maintenance, and I’m learning to be ok with that.

    It is certainly hard for others to understand, but at least we have each other.

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Jen-

      That’s quite the mix of allergies! I know what you mean about being mad at the world. How long have you gone not knowing you were ill from these foods?

      What about potatoes and rice? I find a good sweet potato can really hit the spot for me carb wise and not make me sick.

      As far as vitamin deficient, are you on any supplements? Do you get your blood checked regularly? Low magnesium levels can really cause problems with people~

      Rebecca

       

      •  Jen says:

        About 2 years probably, but it didn’t get noticeable until the last year. I’m on a carb restricted diet to lose the weight, so I try not to eat any carbs, but I can occasionally have one serving in the evenings, so sweet potatoes or a piece of gluten/egg free bread is my pick. Rice and peanuts seem to inflame the yeast that we’re also trying to control.

        I’m taking a bunch of supplements including B6, stress detox, bowel detox, potassium-magnesium, and pepzin GI. I have a follow-up appointment this week, so hopefully I’m well on the recovery road.

         

        •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

          Jen-

          I hope you are well on your way to recovery as well!!!

          xoxo

          Rebecca

           

  •  Brandi says:

    All of this sounds so familiar! I have been trying to learn about the whole GF diet. I also don’t tolerate dairy (except for Greek yogurt) I also don’t eat meat. So I also feel like I eat too much “snacky” GF foods. Rice cakes, rice chips and a ton of fruit. I am obsessed. I lost 65 pounds, the hard way…..being sick from not knowing what was wrong, so I literally starved. I was afraid to eat anything. I felt emaciated. I began drinking Ensure, so I knew that at least I was getting some kind of nutrition. I don’t cook much of my own GF food, because it’s more work and expense, just for me. My husband is a farmboy. Raised on meat and potatoes and bread! I used to enjoy that too, now it makes me feel nauseated to think about it. But I still have to cook this for him. So I snack on rice cakes and fruit while I cook his food. I still don’t think that I am getting the balanced food intake that I should, but so much hurts me, that I stick to what I know doesn’t make me sick. Afraid to try something different. I don’t know how to do this. I thought I already ate healthy, was active enough. Now I am exhausted and in pain ( diagnosed with fibromyalgia), and yes, very depressed. I don’t go out except for with my husband, he helps me try to explain to people what I can and can’t eat, and why (as if I need to explain it, but sometimes we have to just so I won’t be “bullied”!! That’s what it feels like sometimes!! I have even stopped going to church, just because I have been asked, “are you one of those girls who goes and throws up afer you eat?”, another, “do you feel alright, you don’t look like you feel good”, and then there are all the busy bodies, who know EVERYTHING about GF and tell me what I can and can’t eat! Like I said, I lost 65 pounds, fast. Some people look at me “pitifully”. Like I don’t already feel bad enough! So, back to the subject…..I wondered if I am being so paranoid about food, if I was in the midst of having an eating disorder? I still drink Ensure, every morning. And eat fruit during the day. On the positive side, I am grateful and do enjoy this site! I have only recently found you, but it’s a ray of light in this darkness of learning all over again, how to eat healthy. Healthy for me. I do feel better reading all these other comments and to know that I am not the only one! That there are people who do understand and I don’t have to explain my eating habits to, or explain to someone that, no, I don’t go and throw up after I eat, not on purpose anyway! I will end my ramblings now! Thanks for the support, all of you!

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Hi Brandi!

      Thanks for stopping by – 65lbs is a lot! I completely understand about being “bullied.” I usually feel more frustrated than anything! We just need to stand strong as a community for people to realize this isn’t the Atkins Diet or anything else that’s a fad. This is our life and we won’t live in fear or frustration. Let’s all share the things we love, what works, what doesn’t work so we don’t have to go through this alone.

      I’m going to try to go a few days with whole foods and then allow myself some snacks. I know from experience though, you don’t crave the snacks as much when you are eating whole foods.

      Why ensure? Those seem to have a ton of sugar in them!

      Rebecca

      Welcome to Pretty Little Celiac!

       

      •  Brandi says:

        yes, Ensure does have alot of sugar, and ingredients that I normally would stay away from, but it is the only thing that I have found that makes me feel like I can make it thru a day. I began drinking it after I remembered a lady I sat with while she was in hospice. She didn’t/couldn’t eat anything so all she had was Ensure. I went for months before I remembered Martha! So I thought, it’s worth a try. I was concerned about getting enough nutrition and vitamins. I couldn’t take my own supplements on an empty stomach. But I have been drinking one every morning so long that I can’t tolerate anything else in the mornings! And I still have days when I don’t eat b/c I’m either tired of the same old thing evryday or just not able to eat because of pain. It’s a vicious cycle

         

        •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

          Oh, gosh! I know all about vicious cycles!!!

           

  •  susan @ snap and run says:

    I have Celiac as well as dairy and soy intolerances. I can completely understand where you’re coming from. There are days when I literally live on Chex with almond milk because of the convenience of it.

    The biggest thing for me was to disassociate eating with being social. Every once in a while I come across someone who treats Celiac as if it’s a choice I’m making. I usually just say ‘no thank you’ to whatever they’re trying to get me to eat, but if they push me eventually I come straight out and say ‘what you are trying to feed me could cause cancer later on. it is NOT worth it.’. That’s pretty much all it takes

    As for eating out, I have a system now. Only once did I get sick from hidden gluten at a restaurant and it was the first month I was diagnosed. I know how to handle it better now…and awareness has skyrocketed since then, so it’s getting easier. Several of the larger chains…like Chilis and Outback already have gfree menus available.

    As for food itself. I don’t love it anymore. There are plenty of whole food, yummy gfree recipes out there and they are definitely good…but it’s not the same, you know? Nothing is SINFULLY DELICIOUS and at times it’s disappointing.

    But I try to keep the big picture always in mind. I was undiagnosed for a few years and it was to the point where I wondered on a daily basis ‘how can i live like this?’. Now I don’t have to. I have my health, my life and my energy back. I did not develop a terminal ailment, I’m just being forced to eat a certain way. There are definitely worse things in life.

    I’m sure eventually you’ll find your groove!! Good luck

     

  •  GFree Laura says:

    I totally identify with the, “My choices are so limited and I’m already a picky eater so it makes it even more difficult for me to find foods to enjoy. ” comment! I was eating a lot of snacky foods while still in school, but have managed to get on a balanced diet now that I live at home with my parents. You can do it, I believe in you!

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      What foods do you tend to stick with?

      Rebecca

       

  •  Amy says:

    Oh my gosh! How are you in my head????? Every post I read makes me feel so much better that I am not alone! I have a HORRIBLE relationship with food and my body. I was OBSESSED with gluten products for 30 years and just ate and ate. I could not lose weight when I tried and was always sick and tired. I was called lazy and fat pretty much all the time for the first 30 years of my life. It was sad because I am the furthest thing from lazy. My mind is creative and fast but my body always let me down, it could not keep up. The physical part is getting better since I have been gluten free but I still have a lot of work to do on my mind. I struggled so much with food and body issues I have to work at loving them again. I eat like I don’t want to taste the food, fast and distracted. I have been working on eating things with many flavors and tasting and acknowledging each one as I eat. I also have been forgiving my body for all the “lazy” years realizing it actually hung in there pretty well considering the INSANE amounts of gluten and all of the doctors “treatments” that were well intended but so far off!!! Now that I am using fresh herbs and actually tasting my food and forgiving my body I am just starting to see the light!

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Amy!

      Thanks for the comment, I just loved it. It makes ME feel like I am not alone too when everyone posts such wonderful things on my blog posts. At least now I know I’m not crazy!!
      What are your favorite herbs and spices to use? My palate is so bland..

      Rebecca

       

  •  Crystal Humes says:

    Thank you for sharing!!! I also have celiac disease & gastroparesis so I truly understan!!

     

  •  Angela Dennis says:

    I was diagnosed with celiac for about 1 year ago, completely gluten free. I always opt for the quick gluten free snack. Or don’t eat very much at all. I have found my appetite is just not the same anymore. On top of it all I am 22 and single, and when dating it all revolves around food. It’s not that fun always having to explain, oh sorry I can’t eat that, or that, or that. I usually just eat before going out and try to save myself from explaining things all night. Thanks for your blog its good to read things from people who really relate!

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Angela-

      Thanks so much for the post!

      Did you struggle with dating before? I can’t even tell you how many dates I ended early or snuck into a bathroom because I was so sick from my meal. Or being so upset that I had a cute outfit on, only to have my stomach grow to pregnancy looking levels in the middle of the date! I would much rather have said to someone, I’m sorry I have a gluten allergy – than – excuse me could you please drive faster, I really need to use the restroom

      Regardless, we all have our issues. The best thing to get on a date is a small steak and baked potato or vegetable. Just tell them you don’t want seasoning or dressing on the steak!

      Thanks for joining us over here
      Rebecca

       

  •  Kathryn Macri says:

    I can relate. I am 49, have had “a nervous stomach” since I was a kid and became totally dairy free and gluten free over a year ago. I lost 15 pounds last year by not eating any gluten. I do feel much better but I am still 15 pounds over a reasonable goal weight and still have symptoms. I have not been diagnosed with celiac and have had to figure the out through years of trial and error. My husband relies heavily on bread in his diet and doesn’t like vegetables so we usually eat completely different meals as do my children (who are now out of the house at college). All very time consuming with a lot of inherent issues in there! People are always telling me you should make everyone eat the same or providing other helpful advice! I would love to just eat without thinking about it and worrying about my gut health or weight! Even more so, I would love to eat in the company of others without discussing my food choices! My exclamation points are highlighting a fairly constant level of frustration. On the other hand, I am really enjoying learn gin to cook and learning new techniques -when I feel like I have the time. I am enjoying new foods (who knew I could love Kale!). I am enjoying being thinner than I have in years without additional exercise. I would like to embark on an even better year of better more enjoyable eating and exercise. I would like to find some foods to bring to pot lucks, office brunches, lunches and snack fests that are 3 times as expensive as what everyone else brings or that other people might enjoy too. Any suggestions on the last points would be appreciated.

     

    •  PrettyLittleCeliac says:

      Hi Kathryn!

      Thanks for the post. I understand how hard it is to go to events and not be able to eat anything or feel left out. Did you like my facebook page? I try to post many different things on there – including foods, recipes reviews and more. Is there anything particular you are looking for?

      Rebecca

       

  •  Brittany Trentham (@batrentham) says:

    I love this post! I am gluten free and dairy free plus I have a boat load of allergies and intolerances. In fact, it makes it impossible to eat out or eat other people’s food. It can be so challenging trying to explain yourself to others and deal with cookouts and get-togethers! It does get easier over time, but frustrating nonetheless. I realized not too long ago that I wan’t getting enough protein, but now I realize I eat way too much protein powder. I’m trying to figure out what I can do to change my diet and help my hormone levels… which are nonexistent! My estrogen and progesterone are extremely low. (I am at a healthy weight, BMI, and I am working with my doctors on this) I’m so glad I found your blog!!

     

  •  Jen says:

    Thanks so much for sharing your journey and struggles. I have recently been diagnosed with IBS. Although I am not celiac (I was tested) I still seem to have issues with wheat as well as dairy. Even after removing these items, which is not easy as you know, I still have flare ups and get sick. My GI doc said it would be a long journey to figure it all out but it’s so frustrating. Its hard when you feel deprived and still don’t feel better. I know I will eventually figure it out, it’s just going to be a long journey. It really helped to come across your story especially since this has been a tough food week. Looking forward to reading more posts and hearing more from you.

     

  •  SGRhapsodos says:

    I don’t know about you guys, but I was diagnosed with celiac a year ago with antibodies and all and going so far gluten free has only helped the diarrhea. Everything else is going worse. My hormones went out of whack (I’ve been having terrible pms, depression, fatigue) everything is worse gf than it was on gluten. Sex drive is down the drain, etc. I gain so much weight before my periods that my shoes don’t fit. I tried taking ridiculous amounts of supplements and they seem to help me have a sort of normal life, but they’re not helping my hormones. I NEVER EVER EVER EVER EVER!! had these problems while I was on gluten. I was a happy celiac lol…… except for the diarrhea. Not that over ate gluten products anyway. After going gluten free I didn’t want sex with my hubs and I developed cysts in my ovaries AND my pms depression was so bad I was borderline suicidal.
    I find that I was doing better on a low gluten diet. I seem to tolerate certain things more than others (beer, corn flakes, regular soy sauce, miso, etc. are ok). Fermented foods don’t cause me any problems. Breads, pastas, pastries, are another story. They don’t give me diarrhea, but they cause the all too familiar tingle in my belly, but I don’t care about those cuz I don’t miss them. I honestly hate gluten free substitutes and find that I BINGE on them majorly. I feel full after a bowl of corn flakes, but I binge on chex. After going gluten free completely (that means cutting out corn flakes, soy sauce) my binges started becoming uncontrollable (I would binge on pop corn, fruit, dried fruit, nuts, etc.) and I would end up in more pain than if I had had a piece of cake. I don’t know if this is going to make my life worse or not, but I cannot live like this anymore. I miss the old me, and to be honest, worrying too much makes it worse on me than if I just live happy. What I like to do now is just go to that bbq at that friend’s house and eat what is obviously gluten free: veggies, fruits, and meat. If it has a sauce, I don’t touch it. I don’t let it affect me because, the more I think about it, the worse it gets. I can live without bread, but do I have to worry about the speck of malt syrup on my once a month bowl of corn flakes? I doubt it.
    Ladies you need to experiment, irregardless of what the doctor says! You need to listen to your body and give it what it needs. Please be honest with yourselves and know when something is not right, even if everybody says it’s wrong. One piece of advise I’m going to give you ladies is: TAKE A PROBIOTIC!! Kefir, align, whatever. Take it every day of your life!!! You will be able to tolerate a lot more with that. Good luck to you all and if I don’t live long…….well…… I don’t fucking know or care anymore! Peace.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      Are you sure you actually have celiac disease? There are a lot of people who are incorrectly diagnosed. It sounds like the other problems you are having may not be correctly identified and you might want to seek a second opinion.

       

  •  Melissa Todd says:

    I can relate. I eat everything gluten free. Can occasionaly cheat cuz of the anxiety of going out to dinner, goiing to friends house to eat. Like u said worrying how my food is being made. When I started gaining weight I was ina depressed mood. Looking at magizines thinking why cant I look like that. Now i am so focused on the skinny part rather than fit and healthy. I find my self skipping meals or snack foods.

     

  •  Elaine says:

    Pretty sure I was reading my own story here. Glad to know I’m not the only one experiencing what you have expressed. Living with Celiac Disease can be so isolating and add other dietary allergies/sensitivities and it starts to feel like you’re on a deserted island. My kids are my biggest support. Most people are so clueless, just as I was before my diagnosis, they just don’t know how to react.
    Living with Celiacs is totally thought consuming. Awareness and labeling has helped but it’s still a difficult situation.
    Thanks for sharing your story!

     

  •  Tracy says:

    Without to much details I am in SAMs club right now responding to this. I too can not have wheat, dairy, soy, eggs and so much more. I eat before I go to a dinner or go to a BBQ. I work for a new company and will have a dinner with them as a after Christmas thing. And I will not be able to eat most of what is brought. I feel like a freak of nature an no one understands me. Your post hit the nail right on the head. I am sure my husband wonders if I died in here so I better go.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      This probably is my favorite post on my blog! Thanks Tracy for taking the time out of your Sam’s trip to comment :) We are not freaks of nature, but we do have to become very confident and self aware with having these ailments. Everyone feels they need to make a comment about the way we eat and live so it’s challenging to go about our lives in our own way. I’ve always been outspoken so I never have a problem telling people to keep quiet or explaining to them why I have to do the things I do but I understand those that struggle.

       

  •  oceangirlobx says:

    Its amazing. Like you read my mind and put it on paper!

     

  •  Jodie says:

    Check out a documentary called ‘Forks over knives’, then you’ll be glad your body rejects dairy (which makes perfect sense) You may also reconsider your stance about a ‘need’ to eat meat. I’m a celiac, & since switching to a plant based diet, I feel loads better

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      I didn’t care totally for the movie Forks over Knives. I believe some of their research is flawed and biased. But I would never judge someone for eating plant based diets! We all need to listen and respond to our own bodies and that is all that really matters. I am so happy that you feel so much better!

       

  •  Lori says:

    I have Hashimoto’s auto immune disease which I just found out last year though I’ve been on Synthroid for hypothyroid for more years than I can remember. Funny thing is I most likely had Hashimoto’s all along as the hypothyroid problem stems from Hashimoto’s. Conventional doctors don’t even test for it unless you ask and when they do confirm it they don’t change your treatment. There are alternative doctors that have protocol for it but I can’t afford it yet so I am avoiding gluten as I’ve done lots of reading on the subject and 99% of the people with Hashimoto’s have gluten intolerance. From what I’ve read a large portion of the population even without Hashimoto’s have gluten issues and don’t even know it. Even aside from looking for gluten free foods when I go to the grocery store I want to stand there and cry in anguish because 99% of the so called “food” there isn’t suitable for human consumption. All the gmo’s, farmed meat and fish, cloned meat, processed garbage, unnecessary toxic chemical additives that cause food addictions. It’s really a sad state and people are oblivious to it. They don’t seem to realize that all the disease like cancer and heart disease and all the newly wide spread disorders like adhd and more are all likely being caused by what we are consuming. Our bodies are not meant to be toxic waste dumping grounds. Garbage in garbage out as the saying goes. The best I can do it suggest you eat as much organic, unprocessed food as you can. Look for local farms that sell 100% grass fed meats. Buy eggs from local farmers that let their chickens run free and don’t feed them grains either. If you can join a CSA where you buy a share of organic veggies and or meats. http://www.localharvest.org is a good source of CSA’s. http://www.eatwild.com is a good source of grass fed meat farms. Invest in some good appliances and make lots of your own foods. A good dehydrator, a flour mill, (right now I make flour out of rice, quiona, millet in my coffee grinder until I get a flour mill), a Vita Mix. Look into the Paleo diet as that is gluten free. There is so much you can find online in the way or recipes etc. Wishing everyone the best in finding what works for them and returning to excellent health!

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      Thank you Lori for your thoughtful comment! It is so frustrating. I really like shopping at Earth Fare grocery stores because they focus on great brands that don’t have all the junk in them! I actually corrected my thyroid problem with gluten removal and am happy I chose that way instead of medication. It took all year to correct, but I’m ok with that!.

      Rebecca

       

  •  martin says:

    I cannot eat any plant that is in grass family.. And I am happy with that because I feel so much better now, after 30 years of unconscious poisoning my body.. I’ve finally found it myself..

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      That is wonderful!

       

  •  sassyceliac says:

    I swear, it could have been me who wrote that first paragraph. It’s an eating disorder in itself…the obsessiveness of it. And I understand the body betrayal. For me, my antibody levels still refuse to go down (haven’t been tested in a couple months, but last time we checked)…which only adds to my obsessiveness. Because I’m doing all the right things, and yet, my immune system seems to think I’m still consuming gluten. The social challenges, the lack of spontaneity, the constant planning. Sometimes I just want to stop eating altogether. So, yes, thank you for this post. Celiac Disease and disordered eating can definitely go hand in gluten-free hand

     

    •  Marijke van Velsen says:

      Well it can take a year before your body is clean.

      But I know the obsession…Food is really an obsession since I am gluten free. Now that I live on my own work hard and have to cook dinner man…not a lot of variaty there because I want something quick. I wok a lot of stuff with gluten free soy sauce as base. You can use different vegetables and herbs so it’s quite different everytime, but still quick and quite healthy (depending on what you put in it ;-))

      Every time I visit a city or something I am looking around on the internet where can I eat. Am I sure I can trust it’s gluten free or not. Had some very good experiences so it’s getting a bit easier now after 2 years being gluten free. But it’s depending on where I am going, I know that in Germany I usually don’t have to worry. But in the Netherlands (like in Amsterdam) it’s still hard to find a restaurant with some gluten free stuff.

      But sometimes I think well my friend has a daughter with gluten intolerance and can’t have sugar. I mean that’s disaster. No gluten usually means a whole bowl of sugar as ingredient.

       

      •  Rebecca says:

        Thank you so much for your comment! Great tips!

         

  •  christina says:

    This is exactly what I’m going through right now, except I need to gain weight instead of loosing weight.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      Hi Christina!
      Make sure you gain weight using lots of complex carbohydrates like sweet potatoes, brown rice and quinoa along with healthy meats and veggies. That way you can make your body strong too!

       

  •  Kathy says:

    This all sounds so like ME… I have been dealing with celiac disease since 1994 and there are many new foods that fit into the gluten free diet but I am a widow and living alone makes life difficult. I am not looking for a pit party but cooking for myself is boring beyond belief and eating out is expensive to say the least when you need special foods. I am getting to the point that I just don’t care anymore….I get so worn out trying to figure out what I should or shouldn’t eat so reaching for a quick snack doesn’t fit into proper balance for me. My body is just tired all of the time.. I have gone through liver transplant surgery in 2000 so with the combo of drugs I need to take and figure out how to eat healthy…well just wears me out.. Thanks for sharing everything on your site.. it does help… Hugs.. Kathy

     

  •  mary says:

    I also have celiac and food is a constant battle with me. I have low iron and b12 and food isn’t as satisfying as before. I try to b good with snacks but sometimes I fall off the wagon. So far out of my family of 5 I am the only one diagnosed so I dislike cooking for me. Also what makes it difficult is the prices of GF

     

  •  Michelle says:

    I know what you mean. I too lack protein and other good vitamins at times. Those gluten free cookies and pretzels are a quick grab. I notice my hair and nails are not as nice as they used to be. Hang in there, we all probably need to have that salmon and rice dish in the picture all day every day. And I wish I looked like your before picture instead of the weight I am…..200 plus.

     

    •  Amanda YOder says:

      Yes it is a little hard to hear her not be happy with her body when she’s thin, fit, amazing!

       

      •  Cynthia says:

        I think that makes it even harder though. I am pretty fit (at least I was before I was too sick to exercise) I’m 5’7″ was 145lb. I lost 20 pounds being so sick and not being able to eat anything at all. I think I’m too skinny and I feel terrible every time I eat something. My friends are envious of my body because I’ve had two babies and look “great”! It makes it hard to get support that I need to get through this emotionally when everyone keeps saying, “wow, you look great, I hate you!” I don’t feel great.

         

  •  Amanda YOder says:

    Glad to hear I’m not alone. I do find I’m guilty of gluten free snacks instead of spending all the time to make a good well balanced meal sometimes, because there is no quick or premade options like there was before I had to go GF and I’m often out of time or energy!

     

  •  mrscynthiaallen@gmail.com says:

    Thank you for posting your struggles. I have been having a tough time not getting depressed about food. I started out with gallbladder attacks and they found celiac by accident. The picture all came together, but the initial treatment for gallbladder made me so sick I couldn’t eat anything without IBS or leaky gut symptoms. I am improving, but still can’t eat gluten, soy, dairy, fructose, beef, fatty foods. Talk about having a hard time going to parties or staff potlucks. Or wanting to cook anything at all. Very frustrating!

     

  •  Jodie says:

    Hi, I was diagnosed with celiacs desease as well as ulcerative colitis over 7 years ago. Since then I have struggled with many problems, & I have suffered through stages of being violently ill, even having to leave a number of jobs.
    I thought I would share a few things that I have learned over the years…
    Firstly, I now refuse to eat out (personally I make no exceptions) However if you really want to, I would recommend only ever eating at a venue that is 100% gluten-free.
    My diet has also shifted first to vegetarian, then to vegan, & I now have less trouble with my weight, as well as bloating, tiredness, etc.
    I also highly recommend green smoothies, I have one every day, & they make me feel amazing. It’s also a fail-safe way to get some important nutrients into your diet that are easily digested & absorbed .
    I hope this info is helpful!

     

  •  Stacy says:

    It is fascinating to hear everyone’s struggles. Thank you all for sharing!
    I’m at the beginning of this new gluten free life. I think I’m still so focused on WHAT? I can eat that I haven’t moved to the angry part. It was an accident that I was diagnosed. I was deeply disappointed with the “nutritionist” that my doctor sent me to . . . I learned more from a few hours on the internet. She basically gave me recipes to replace bread and gluten filled items, instead of really talking about how to move to a naturally gluten free diet. Luckily, I have an amazing husband who loves to cook. He makes the most incredible things out of protein and vegetables. When he is around, I don’t feel deprived. The minute I have to fend for myself, I get nervous.
    The thing that I am finding most frustrating, is that I’ve been gluten free about 2 months and I don’t really feel that much better. My energy is better and I did get “glutened” once from a restaurant. It was horrible – 6 hours of intense stomach pain and migraine and then three full days to recover. I am understanding the danger of eating out and have only two places that I haven’t made me sick.
    I keep searching for the answer of WHEN am I going to really feel better? How long will it take and am I doing enough?
    I realize this is a rather random post, but I would like to be a part of this community and really appreciate everyone’s honesty and openness. Thank you Rebecca for bringing us all together.