Workout of the Week – July 8th 2013

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Workout of the Week

This weekend, I hit a number on the scale I thought I would never see again. I feel amazing but I don’t look the part, which is always a struggle for me in the fitness industry. I absolutely love my clients because they encourage and support me as much as I do them and they never judge me for what I look like because I have the knowledge and education to help them. They realize my health problems have taken a toll on my body and I continue to struggle with random things as they come up which is just part of living with a chronic disease.

For the past few weeks, I’ve been experimenting with different workouts and am realizing, shorter and more intense workouts are getting the job done without leaving me sore for a week and preventing me from getting a workout in the rest of the week. This is the most incredible feeling. It’s like when you are working on a puzzle but you can seem to find a key piece that’s holding up the rest of your board.

I’ve been playing around with foods as well and am realizing after an internal struggle of not wanting to give up corn and grains, I think they need to go bye-bye. I just feel better when they aren’t in my life. I’m less bloated and I feel like I have more energy. I need to stop fighting my body and go with the flow.

I’m very petite and adding 30 pounds to my frame is a lot of weight. It’s time to focus, create a goal board and stick to the program. Now I know what my limitations are and what works for me, I can finally create a program for myself that will trigger weight loss and help build lean muscle with a good diet and supplements.

My before pictures are taken and tucked away in a secret file. I think to hold me accountable I will post the progress pictures every other week. That will keep me in line with following the guidelines of my program along with allowing me to see results. What I’ve learned in the last 5 years, is you can’t use the scale exclusively to see results and I’m going to show you exactly what I mean in the next 3 months.

The past few weeks, I’ve limited my intake of sugar and am feeling pretty good! The cravings are going away which is something that happens if you can fight through the cravings in the first 10 days. Food will taste much better when you eliminate fake sugars and corn syrup from your life. It takes a bit of time for your taste buds to adjust but when they do, you will be pleasantly surprised!

I’m excited to take this journey with you. I hope I can inspire you to do the same!

I will post workouts throughout the upcoming weeks and an example of what I’m eating during the day to help you with ideas on getting fit yourself. I’m working on videos as well which I will post each week on the YouTube page, so make sure you subscribe!

 

Your Top 6 Questions about Gluten Free and Celiac Disease Answered!

Your Top 6 Questions about Gluten Free and Celiac Disease Answered!

Tune in to hear what I have to say!

You can subscribe to my podcast from your iTunes player to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

6 questions I answer –

1. Do I really need to replace all my items?

2. Do I really need gluten-free beauty products?

3. What do I do when I find myself craving gluten filled foods?

4. How do I deal/cope with the frustrations of celiac disease?

5. Are those digestive enzymes like GlutenCutter safe for me?

6. How do I take control of my weight after going gluten-free?

25 Things I’ve Learned from Celiac Disease

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It’s been an incredible life long journey for me (and many of you) until I finally got the answers I needed for all my medical problems. It seems as if it were yesterday that I was sitting in a doctor’s office, waiting to be seen, only to leave disappointed and without any hope or answers for what was wrong.

Another doctor, another prescription and still no relief…

But the last few weeks, I’ve had some time to reflect and really think about what having celiac disease means to me and some of the major things I’ve learned over the last 18 months through my own personal experiences and the last 10 months as a blogger. If you have things you learned about gluten-free living or celiac disease, please feel free to post them in the comments so other readers know they aren’t alone!

  1. My celiac disease is not your celiac disease. I can’t emphasize this one enough! We all have different triggers and ailments so it’s incredibly important to pay attention to your own body versus what you hear from me or others on forums and websites.
  2. Celiac comes with other problems. Endometriosis, thyroid problems, arthritis and vitamin deficiencies for me!
  3. Vitamin & Nutrient levels should be tested on a regular basis to ensure you are supplementing properly to nourish your body with what’s missing.
  4. Gluten will make you feel crazy, act crazy, think you’re crazy and make you paranoid. It consumes you life and there are times when I just have to stop and think… at least it’s managed with food.
  5. It seems to be the only disease people don’t know enough about to tell me how to live my life. Now, gluten-free is another story but celiac disease usually doesn’t get too many unsolicited comments or advice from others.
  6. You have to be incredibly educated about celiac disease, living gluten-free and your body to be safe as much as possible.
  7. It’s essential to learn how to plan accordingly when traveling, dining out or anything out of the norm to prevent you from being stuck.
  8. A gluten-free emergency supply kit is a necessity not an idea.
  9. Poop can tell you so much about your eating habits and health of your body!
  10. I still learn about gluten in things and are surprised by it – tea bags are my most recent discovery!
  11. The gluten-free and celiac community is amazing and I am honored to be a part of it!
  12. I’ve come to realize that packaged gluten-free food is my worst enemy. For my health & my waist line – real foods is where it’s at!
  13. Celiac gave me the opportunity to see who my real friends are and learn the ones who care enough about me to always make me feel safe.
  14. Celiac and fitness is an interesting concept. I’m excited to come out with my program late summer!
  15. I’ve learned to accept the days when my body won’t cooperate and stopped beating myself up about feeling tired, having a headache or achy joints.
  16. Being curvy and healthy is more important than being lean and unhappy.
  17. Living gluten-free doesn’t have to be more expensive – you just have to plan better and eat clean to keep the budget tight.
  18. I’ve learned to look at life as a new adventure, instead of letting it stress me out every day.
  19. My family shouldn’t be burdened by my celiac disease, so I try to bring my own foods to events just to make sure I’m safe and not starving.
  20. Airports are the worst for living gluten-free and with celiac.
  21. Writing and blogging helps keep me sane and warms my heart when I’m able to help you too.
  22. There are no true gluten-free substitutions. Gluten free bread is not soft sourdough bread and it never will be. Gluten-free Oreos are not the ones I’ve learned to love over my lifetime an none can duplicate it either. I’m done trying to find substitutes and instead I’m learning to love new things instead.
  23. I’m proud to take charge of my health and not take no for an answer. I refused to accept that I didn’t have anything wrong with me and I was correct.
  24. I love my husband more now than ever. He has been the most amazing and supportive person through this and I certainly hit the husband lotto.
  25. I love my body more now than ever. All of it. All the problems. All the wonderful things people take for granted, I’ve learned to love and enjoy.

Comments

  1.  Sheryl Rex says:

    I have learned that ‘Gluten Guard’ meds, do NOT work on everything. It is easier just to go without.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      What are “gluten guards?”

       

  2.  Atherton Baking Co. says:

    I’ve learned the GF is very supportive and generous. During a very low period I found Karen Morgan & Tim Lawson, they taught me how to be strong! The GF fam shares and supports all over the world! When you reach out, someone is always there!

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      I second that with the community! It is so true!!

       

  3.  Charlotte says:

    I’ve learned to be a better and more adventurous cook. I’ve learned that there is MORE to eat as a celiac than I ever ate pre-diagnosis and I was a pretty adventurous eater already even with a ton of allergies. I’ve learned to be my own advocate. I’ve learned that I have some AMAZING friends who support me and my GF life.

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      Those are awesome things! Thank you so much for sharing :)

       

  4.  Mindy says:

    I love the 25 things you have learned! Very inspirational for me! I still struggle with many things related to living with Celiac after almost 5 years of living gluten free.

    I also need to learn how to attend events without feeling so awkward when taking my own food. Right now one of my challenges is attending the service’s at church that offer crackers for the Lord’s supper practice. The preacher told me to just bring my own cracker’s. Still I dealt with a lot of guilt for awhile by not participating in the practice at church.

    I do still have days that I do not feel well mainly due to environmental allergies and other food allergies like dairy, soy, yeast and garlic which makes my eliminating other foods important.

    Am still trying to figure out how to get high protein (which of course helps the energy level) Not easy when I am not a huge meat person.

    Thanks for these wonderful comments!

     

    •  Chessie says:

      Mindy, I was diagnosed with celiac disease about a month ago (quite a shock) and I’m slowly climbing out of the deep hole of fatigue I was in. I hear you about protein, because I’ve been vegan for about a dozen years and most of the vegan “fake meats” out there are made with lots of wheat gluten. So, it’s beans, tofu, tempeh, nuts, and seeds for me. I think I can get enough protein, but it will take daily thought. It’s too bad you don’t do soy, but there are lots of other beans and legumes out there.

      Oh, how I loved stuff made with “vital wheat gluten” (i.e., deadly wheat gluten). But yeah, turns out there’s a reason why it didn’t agree with me so much.

      Rebecca, thanks for the 25 tips!

       

      •  Rebecca says:

        Chessie-

        Thanks for listing some other sources of protein! I think people automatically assume that you can only get it from meats.

         

    •  Rebecca says:

      Mindy if you eat eggs – Pasturized egg whites are a perfect way to get protein into your diet. They don’t taste like anything and are protein packed. I put them in my juice and shakes. You can buy them in larger packages which are much more affordable through places like Egg Whites International. They come frozen and then you just keep them in the fridge and use them as you wish.

       

  5.  Brittany says:

    Do you have a post somewhere explaining:

    “A gluten-free emergency supply kit is a necessity not an idea.”

    What is that?!

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      An emergency kit is something that you would want to have in case there is a disaster like a hurricane, power outage, tornado or fire. It should filled with gluten-free foods that you can consume in case you don’t have access to anything for a few days.

       

  6.  Angela says:

    Wow I had never thought about tea bags. Thanks for the tips!

     

    •  Rebecca says:

      You’re welcome!

       

  7.  Martin says:

    re12: Great to see more celiacs avoid processed food and look into the real food/paleo diet

     

  8.  Amanda Yoder says:

    Love this! So true and so relatable!

     

  9.  Kay Gaumer says:

    I’ve been gluten free since February of this year. It has be a challenge to adjust my diet. I am also allergic to dairy and most grains. I think your comment about making mew ‘friends’ and not trying to substitute gluten free products for old ‘friends’ is an excellent idea. I lean toward a vegetarian diet and buy organic and GMO free products. I also try to buy local as the products are fresher and tastier that way.

     

  10.  Sherry says:

    I am glad I found this blog. I can relate so much to what you said!

Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act – Interview Congressman Tim Ryan

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Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act

I had the pleasure of interviewing U.S. Representative from the 13th District of Ohio, Tim Ryan,

about the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act.

Rep. Tim Ryan (D)
Rep. Tim Ryan (D)

I am from North East Ohio and am proud to say this is Congressman Ryan’s district! Unfortunately, he was called to vote and I only had a brief 10 minutes to talk to him about the Act. But, you can listen to our conversation right here…

According to Congressman Ryan’s website,

The Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act has been endorsed by: American Celiac Disease Alliance, National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, Celiac Disease Foundation, Celiac Sprue Association, Gluten Intolerance Group, North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and the American College of Gastroenterology.

So,  what can you do to help?

You can call or write to your local representative and tell them you support this Act! Most of our congressmen have email addresses that you can contact them. This bill was reintroduced this year, after failing last year despite thousands of letters of support to congress. Our letters got this Act reintroduced and it’s up to you to keep the momentum by reaching out and contacting your congressmen!

Click Here to find out who your congressman or woman is to contact regarding the Gluten in Medicine Disclosure Act!

Click Here if you need help with how to write a letter to congress!

Click Here if you want to contact Congressman Tim Ryan!

If you would like a good guide about the medications, http://www.glutenfreedrugs.com/ is a great resource and website for information on gluten in medications.

Do you have a story about gluten in medications?

Do you have tips for other people that struggle with gluten in medicine at the pharmacy or getting answers?

I wanna her about it – post in the comment section below :)

 

 

Ask Rebecca: Do I Need to get Tested for Celiac Disease?

This is a tough one for me. I believe everyone has the right to follow their own route for treatment. There are some people who can eliminate gluten, feel amazing and live on their lives as normal but I don’t think that’s the norm for this disease.

I believe if you can afford the testing or have health insurance, it is essential to get tested for a number of reasons. Hear me out..

1. You may or may not have celiac disease but I can almost guarantee you have some sort of nutrition deficiencies that can only be determined by blood work. This isn’t as simple as just taking a multi vitamin. The only way to adequately determine what vitamins you need is to get the proper blood work done to determine your individual needs.

2. Depending on your blood work, your doctor may order you to have a biopsy done to determine the level of damage caused to your intestines from the undiagnosed celiac disease. This again is something that can only be determined by a doctor.

3. The only way to determine these things is to keep consuming gluten and get your testing done. You cannot have the tests done if you eliminate gluten from your diet before your testing because the results will be skewed. So, it won’t do you any good if you eliminate gluten now and then decide in 3 months you want to get tested.

4. I’ve talked to many of you who say that you may not have taken the gluten-free diet and lifestyle seriously without the celiac disease diagnosis. This may or may not be an issue for you. For me, I can tell you that if I thought I could get away with a little bit once in a while, my situation would be very different right now because I would be eating a soft pretzel every couple of months to satisfy my needs. BUT, because I know I have celiac disease, this is completely out of my mind. I wouldn’t think of is.

5. Fertility problems are a major issue with people who have celiac disease. If you plan on having children or are struggling with fertility now, I would recommend you get tested ASAP for celiac disease. I would hate to see anyone not get tested, go through infertility treatments, only to find out they could have solved the problems strictly by living a gluten-free diet and managing deficiencies.

6. There is potential for undiagnosed celiac disease to cause other major health problems as we grow older and even contribute to bowel and other cancers. This is something for you to be aware of as you get older to monitor your health.

Do you have a different story? Why or why not did you choose to get tested? I want to hear about it!~

Should You Take Digestive Enzymes for Gluten?

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Should You Take Digestive Enzymes for Gluten?

No.

I am frequently asked about gluten enzyme supplements and I just wanted to give you my opinion on them.

These so-called enzymes do NOT give you the green light to eat gluten if you have celiac disease. They are not a cure for celiac! There is a false belief out there that it is acceptable to take these pills with a piece of cake and you will be fine. It’s not that simple. There is NO PROOF or medical research showing that these enzymes work. Why? Because they are not FDA approved and the companies can make whatever claims they want about their products except saying it cures and treats disease.

Now, some of you will say “Hey! I use them and they work.”

Do they really? How do you know what they are doing to your intestines and body chemistry? How do you know they aren’t causing internal problems?

I seriously doubt an over the counter supplement that’s $18 from WalMart is the latest and greatest treatment or medication for celiac disease.

There sure seems to be a lot of people saying they “aren’t getting better” or “still feeling sick.” A part of me can’t help but think some of that is due to the false sense of security from taking these medications.

While these “gluten enzymes” may break down some particles of gluten, there is no way for sure to know if they are gone and not causing damage to your body. Why take that risk? Save your money and buy some supplements your body can use effectively and will help you with healing and digestion!!

The ONLY way to manage celiac disease is with a strict, dedicated gluten-free diet. It makes me a little sad when I hear people say they wish they could just take a pill because your body is clearly telling you it doesn’t want gluten and clearly rejects it. We are the only people who can manage their chronic disease with food and in a natural way which should be a blessing to all of us!

Now, there is a company that filed for patents for enzyme use in medication to treat celiac disease. Alvine Pharma is working towards finding medication for all of us suffering from this disease. They are in phase II of clinical trials but nothing has been approved yet.

ImmusanT is a potential vaccine for celiac disease which is showing promise. They are still in the early stages but it is promising to know that there are things in the works for us!

Are you looking for information about gluten poisoning? Check out my post with 47 commons symptoms!

Have you been poisoned and are looking for help on healing faster? Check out my post with 20 tips and ideas for gluten poisoning recovery! 

Ask Rebecca: How do I convince my family to get tested for celiac disease?

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This begins my new Monday segment of Ask Rebecca! I will pick one question per week from the Facebook page, messages and email and answer it to the best of my ability! Today’s question comes from Facebook – Judy Grover!!

“How do I convince my family to get tested for celiac disease?

Rebecca: I honestly don’t think there is any good answer for this. Just like anything else, your family has to be on board with thinking they have a problem and be willing to get tested. The testing is expensive and can be challenging to get an accurate diagnosis. If there are no obvious symptoms, the person is also less likely to spend the money on getting the testing done. My mom didn’t end up getting tested until I nagged her for months about asking her doctor. Then when she finally did ask the doctor, he gave her inaccurate information because he was not educated on the disease. He told her because she did not have diarrhea, she didn’t need to get tested. It wasn’t until after I gave her more detailed information about all the possible symptoms and encouraged her to get tested again that she finally completed the test. The doctor (whose results I believe are suspect) told her she did not test positive for celiac disease and she didn’t need to be concerned. Again, I don’t know what tests were run or if they were even checked correctly. So, that’s the only thing I can go on. What I would encourage you to do is the following:

  • Become as educated as you can be on the disease to explain the importance of getting tested. Without being able to explain the importance and why you think they need to be tested, it’s going to be a struggle to get them to do it.
  • Remember that not everyone has it in your family just because you do! We are quick to assume everyone has it or should get tested for it because we are diagnosed, when that’s not always the case.
  • Keep your family updated on your own medical journey. Don’t be overbearing about it or make constant digs because it’s likely to backfire.
  • Don’t forget that as adults, we have the right to get our own testing done. It’s our own health and bodies and we should do what we feel is right for ourselves and not anyone else. Haven’t you ever had someone tell you to get tested for this or that when you were struggling with your symptoms? Sometimes the shoe fit and you asked your doctor, but other times you felt you didn’t have the symptoms so it wasn’t worth getting tested. We should respect our family’s rights to do what they see fit with their bodies. We can’t control how or what they do! The only thing we can be sure of is that we are treating ourselves the way we believe is happy and healthy.

Did you successfully get your family to get tested? Please leave your story below!

 

Celiac and Fitness: Everything You Need to Know Podcast

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This week I address celiac disease and fitness with my podcast – On The Air with Pretty Little Celiac.

I talk about motivation tips, how to get started and discuss the importance of moving when suffering from a chronic auto-immune disease!

Don’t forget you can subscribe on iTunes so you never miss a podcast.

YOU are the only person in control of YOUR health!

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I recently heard a story about someone who felt she “owed” it to her family to eat normal for a meal during a celebration event and this made me incredibly sad.

Is it because our medicine is food that makes it so hard for people to follow a strict gluten-free diet? Is it because we associate food as something our bodies need and really can’t understand how consuming gluten with celiac disease impacts our health now and in the future? Is it because for some of us the negative effects aren’t immediate like anaphylaxis so we treat it with less seriousness?

If your family member had lung cancer, would you expect them to go to a cigar club with you for your birthday?

No?

Well, then why would we expect someone with celiac disease to indulge in a piece of cake for a birthday?

Our society and culture is so wrapped around food, making it difficult for us to eliminate gluten because we feel our social lives are taken from us or our ability to have fun with friends. The crazy thing about living gluten-free is that it only confines us if we give it permission to do so. Gluten-Free is challenging and so is staying safe, but I’ll preach it over and over and over that with careful planning, a successful gluten-free life can happen. I live a full, happy, busy gluten-free life because I spent the time learning where and what my body loves to eat. I know what to order at even the scariest restaurants but still keep my fingers crossed knowing I did the best I could with the situation at hand. And, very rarely have I had a problem. Usually it’s when I let my guard down that I get glutened.

It is entirely possible training for a fitness competition and dealing with the negative and rude comments from people about what I ate during those times prepped me for the ignorance of people I meet now while living gluten-free. But, in all honesty, I don’t really care what people say about my eating habits because I’ve NEVER. FELT. BETTER. That’s really all our friends and family should be concerned about when it comes to our health. The foods I consume are healthy and not slowly killing me so where’s the problem?

At some point, you need to accept that others opinions don’t really matter. As long as you are educated about your disease, following the guidelines and living a happy life – that’s what is important. For me, I’m not asking anyone else to live gluten-free. I don’t promote gluten-free for people who don’t need it and I don’t go on and on about my problems unless someone asks me. Don’t get me wrong, I love educating others about my disease and gluten-free living and I’m a huge big mouth advocate too! But I know what I can eat, where I can eat and how to order – which makes all the difference in the world when it comes to staying safe.

But I can tell you that I would never, ever risk my life to feel normal. And you shouldn’t either! I’m the only one that will suffer the consequences and frankly there aren’t any gluten filled foods worth being sick again. (A really hot soft pretzel is very tempting at times though, after all I am human!) Check out an older post of my about why cheating on celiac is a horrible idea.

Bottom line is this… You don’t OWE anyone, anything when it comes to YOUR health.

One of my favorite quotes is by Eleanor Roosevelt –

“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

Celiac Awareness and The Buckeye Journal

The Buckeye Journal Cover
The Buckeye Journal Cover

I can honestly say this is the best week of my life.

I’ve dedicated the last 8 months to Pretty Little Celiac and Bexa Body Fitness and all of those accomplishments were showcased this week. First with the Columbus Business First Forty under 40 award and now with the COVER of The Buckeye Journal.

Is this real life?

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This magazine circulates to thousands of central Ohio residents who will read about celiac disease and hopefully this will bring awareness and education to all that take the time to read it! My vision for the article is that everyone who picks up a copy will understand the struggles we go through and maybe even could help someone get diagnosed. There are people I will reach and I won’t even know it but that’s okay because I know in my heart I helped. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, or maybe you just stopped by today – you should know I’m a type-A, overachiever who loves helping other people. It makes my day when I get emails, messages, comments and more letting me know how much our stories are alike or that I helped you through a difficult time. You have no idea how much it personally affects me!

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I have the most amazing things planned  for Pretty Little Celiac until the end of 2013. I know we are ending celiac awareness month but it’s my goal to make every month dedicated to celiac awareness. My projects are going to help so many people, that I just can’t wait to get them done and share them with the world. I hope you can sense my excitement for this blog because I think I might jump out of my chair.

Thanks for reading – Stay tuned for what’s to come!

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