Celiac Awareness and The Buckeye Journal

The Buckeye Journal Cover
The Buckeye Journal Cover

I can honestly say this is the best week of my life.

I’ve dedicated the last 8 months to Pretty Little Celiac and Bexa Body Fitness and all of those accomplishments were showcased this week. First with the Columbus Business First Forty under 40 award and now with the COVER of The Buckeye Journal.

Is this real life?

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This magazine circulates to thousands of central Ohio residents who will read about celiac disease and hopefully this will bring awareness and education to all that take the time to read it! My vision for the article is that everyone who picks up a copy will understand the struggles we go through and maybe even could help someone get diagnosed. There are people I will reach and I won’t even know it but that’s okay because I know in my heart I helped. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, or maybe you just stopped by today – you should know I’m a type-A, overachiever who loves helping other people. It makes my day when I get emails, messages, comments and more letting me know how much our stories are alike or that I helped you through a difficult time. You have no idea how much it personally affects me!

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I have the most amazing things planned  for Pretty Little Celiac until the end of 2013. I know we are ending celiac awareness month but it’s my goal to make every month dedicated to celiac awareness. My projects are going to help so many people, that I just can’t wait to get them done and share them with the world. I hope you can sense my excitement for this blog because I think I might jump out of my chair.

Thanks for reading – Stay tuned for what’s to come!

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Gluten Free Traveling Tips: Podcast

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Gluten Free Traveling Tips

Aaron and I go On the Air to talk about how we make our traveling trips successful! We give you our advice for what works and what hasn’t worked in the past along with great ideas and tips to stay as safe as possible during vacation.

We talk about research, planning, the best travel snacks and more!

Oh yeah, and we get our first live caller! How exciting! See what advice I have for her son who is struggling to find a camp that will accommodate his needs and for her daughter who is struggling with staying gluten-free after a celiac diagnosis!

We also have a little banter back and forth so you can get an idea of our relationship.

Want to wait until later to listen? Pretty Little Celiac is available on iTunes! You can subscribe to my page on iTunes and listen whenever you get the chance. I’ve had some amazing feedback on my podcast show, so please check them out. They have been really beneficial to a lot of people.

Have an idea for my next show? Email me

Enjoy!

 

47 Gluten Poisoning Symptoms

47 Symptoms of Gluten Poisoning
47 Symptoms of Gluten Poisoning

We’ve all been there and done that… The unfortunate incident when you accidentally consumed gluten and now are suffering the consequences. It’s a horrible experience for most of us, especially if you are very sensitive to gluten and have celiac disease.

But, your celiac is not my celiac and we all respond differently. I’ve noticed I don’t respond the same to malt as I do to wheat. Sometimes I get diarrhea and sometimes my joints swell instantly. It seems I never know what I’m going to get when I accidentally eat gluten. Needless to say, just because I blog about it, speak about it and educate about it – it doesn’t make me immune from it! It happens to the best of us. We let our guard down for just one minute or allow assumptions to rule our decisions and it happens. For me, it doesn’t happen too often, but it still gets me!

If you are looking for help after the fact. I did a blog post on recovery tips that my readers came up with also on Facebook!

So, I took a poll on Facebook and asked my readers what symptoms they experience when they accidentally consume gluten.

Here is a huge list of 47 poisoning symptoms they suffer from after consuming gluten.

  1. Extreme fatigue
  2. Joint pain
  3. Swelling
  4. Bloating
  5. Clothes don’t fit
  6. Abdominal pain
  7. Extreme thirst
  8. Brain fog
  9. Gas
  10. Irritability
  11. Flu-like symptoms
  12. Skin rashes
  13. Nausea
  14. Heartburn
  15. Vomiting
  16. Intestinal cramping/severe urges
  17. Heart attack feeling
  18. Dizziness
  19. Anxiety
  20. Restlessness
  21. Ringing in ears
  22. Vertigo
  23. Heart palpitations/irregular heart beat
  24. Extremely emotional
  25. Joint pain in fingers similar to carpal tunnel
  26. Concentration problems
  27. Sweating/Cold Sweats
  28. Depression
  29. Gums ache
  30. Weight gain
  31. Eczema
  32. Pimples
  33. Aggrevates other symptoms from other diseases like arthritis or PCOS
  34. Mouth Sores including canker sores
  35. Puffiness in the face
  36. PMS symptoms
  37. Cravings for more gluten filled foods
  38. Dermatitis Herpetiformis outbreak
  39. Sinus pain and running nose
  40. Migraines
  41. Swollen ankles (edema)
  42. Shortness of breath
  43. Numbness in limbs, tingly sensations
  44. Acid Reflux
  45. Constipation
  46. Raging Anger and Severe Mood swings
  47. Swollen tongue

For me, I typically get joint pain and swelling along with bloating immediately after eating gluten. Then my stomach starts to hurt, a painful hurt and I can feel a headache slowly coming on, almost like torture.

Most people mentioned the symptoms can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. It isn’t an easy fix. It’s quite a different experience for me than when I have lactose. That just puts me in the restroom and then I’m fine. The other symptoms don’t come along with it like gluten poisoning. So, it’s up to you to figure out what affects you the most and what to really avoid. For those of us with celiac disease, we don’t have a choice, we must avoid gluten at all costs.

Gluten Poisoning at the Ballpark – Redd’s Cider

Redd’s Apple Ale is Not Gluten Free
Redd’s Apple Ale is Not Gluten Free

Gluten poisoning. I did not miss you.

I’ve been doing so great without you. No hassles. No problems. Just living my life like you didn’t exist.

Bam.

That’s when it happens.

We went to the Cincinnati Reds game and usually I get an awesome fruit plate and a giant bottle of water during the games and we go out to eat after. While we were in the little United Dairy Farmer shop at the stadium, I scanned the beer section looking for something to have.

Redd’s Apple Ale. How cool, they added an apple cider to the mix. “Exceptionally Crisp Apple Ale” said the can – Okay sweet! I scooped one up for $11 and we went back to our seats.

A few innings into the game, my fingers started swelling to the point where I had to crank my wedding ring off my finger. It was so painful! The ring was completely surrounded by bloated finger flesh. We were in the sun, so I assumed maybe it was because of that.

Then I posted a picture of it online and had a few comments that they couldn’t find that it was gluten-free. So of course, when I looked, I saw it is a regular beer but an apple ale.

I’m the first one to admit I screwed up. I should have known better. I looked at every other product in the stadium that I ate to be sure I could eat them. But, I just assumed it was gluten-free. If anything, always learn that you can’t ever assume! Always research.

HOWEVER…..

I would like to point out that the can had a giant apple on it and the marketing of the can looked very much like apple cider ale’s I’ve had before that are gluten-free. It was easy to mistake this for a regular gluten-free cider because of the packaging. Go to their site at http://www.reddsapple.com and tell me if you think it’s a beer!

But I’m poisoned. So, now what?

What I’m finding interesting about this gluten poisoning incident are my symptoms are not stomach related at all. I did get bloated but had absolutely no gas or intestinal distress. My joints blew up like crazy and are stiff now, which affected my dexterity while playing Bejeweled Blitz on the drive home from the game. I can also feel some nerve ending problems on my skin all over my body, like pricks. But, I noticed my ear canals are aching, very similar to when my allergies are acting up. I can feel how tender they are when I rub them and they just are getting very uncomfortable. It’s also funny because I have what I like to call a gluten skin patch. It’s in my right elbow and I get bumps on it whenever I eat something with gluten. It doesn’t happen often, but when I get a rash there, I know something was off during the day.

I’m just baffled at the lack of stomach problems. Could my stomach be healed after almost 1.5 years? Could a strong, healed stomach reduce the intestinal symptoms of gluten poisoning? What do you think?

So, for now I will drink a ton of water, take a nice hot bath filled with epsom salts and lavender oil, pop 2 Tylenol arthritis and hope for a good night sleep. Tomorrow will be a better day, the effects will wear off but I will have it hot on my mind the next time I want to try something I’m not sure of, like a new drink.

My celiac gluten patch
My celiac gluten patch

 

Super Easy Bison Gluten-Free Chili

Grocery Items! I didn’t end up using the Spinach and I wouldn’t use the paste second time around
Grocery Items! I didn’t end up using the Spinach and I wouldn’t use the paste second time around

Bison Gluten-Free Chili

1lb Bison stew meat or Bison steaks (cut into bite size pieces)

1 Green Pepper

3 Stalks of celery

1 Can of tomato sauce

1 Can of roasted tomatoes

1 Can of kidney beans

1 Can of cannellini beans

1 Tablespoon chili powder

1 Tablespoon garlic salt

1 Tablespoon onion powder

1/2 Tablespoon cumin

Lactose free or regular sour cream

Shredded cheddar cheese

**All brands of ingredients should be checked to ensure they are indeed gluten-free**

After browning I cut them into little bite size pieces.
After browning I cut them into little bite size pieces.

1. Cut the bison into small bite size pieces and put in a skillet or frying pan to brown to desired temperature. Medium is good for this because they will cook more in the chili while it’s on the stove.

2. Get out a large soup pot or slow cooker to put the rest of the ingredients.

3. Cut the green pepper and celery into bite size pieces.

4. After browning the bison and cutting the veggies, place everything together in the soup pot or slow cooker. I don’t drain the beans because it makes the chili less thick. Stir everything together and turn on a med/low heat. Let simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour.

Just throw it all into the pot!
Just throw it all into the pot!

5. I love to top my bowl of chili with shredded cheese and a dollop of sour cream. I found a great brand of lactose free sour cream that I really love.

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Of course feel free to add some spice, I like things pretty mild due to heartburn with spicy foods! I started out with adding some tomato paste but it made the chili a little too thick for my liking. I would skip it in your version if you like the sauce thinner.

 

 

 

 

 

Living and Coping with Chronic Illness: Staying Positive is Key!

Today is day 3 of recovery from my laparascopy procedure. I’m still in quite a bit of pain, nauseous if I get up to move around  and have a huge swollen belly. My body hasn’t stopped itching since I had the procedure despite taking a shower and rinsing all the antibiotic gel stuff off. But overall, I think I’m healing more and more each day. I feel much more aware today despite being very sore still.

The laparascopy confirmed an endometriosis diagnosis and I also have an inflamed bladder, whcih I will need to go to a urologist specialist to have it cheked out. I will go back to the doctor  in a couple of weeks to follow up and see where we go from here.

I wanted to write this post after a negative comment I read on a forum while researching chronic disease. It was a comment about a certain chronic disease being “fake” just to collect disability money and live off the system, which I found highly offensive. I never personally had someone say this to me (partially because I would chew them out) but I know other friends have heard similar things. I have however heard the following on numerous occasions:

Yes, I know there is “something wrong with me.”

Yes, I know that this “isn’t normal.”

Yes, I am “sick of being sick.”

N0, I am “not pregnant.”

No, I am “not falling apart.”

I do not need a constant reminder from people about what I am going through. You want to know what I need? More of the supporting, loving and encouraging people in my life that have been there through it all, never question my illness or treatment and make me feel sane during a very emotionally charged time. If you are not one of these people, please don’t expect to hear from me that much.

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Sometimes I think I need another business card for my issues or a line on my resume for my special needs.  It’s very hard for some people to imagine that this could happen to someone all at once or that the treatment is difficult and slow. It’s even more difficult for people to believe it happens to young people like me who are in their early 30′s. That usually takes the direction into a conversation of how much worse it’s going to be when I get “older.”

Living with a chronic illness is difficult enough, we don’t need people in our lives challenging how we feel, minimizing our pain and treating us differently for suffering. I never thought in a million years I would spend an entire year trying to find answers. I didn’t expect to spend a whole year dramatically changing my entire lifestyle.

A chronic disease is something that lasts longer than 3 months and affects numerous parts of your life. Right now I’m living with celiac disease, endometriosis, arthritis, latex sensitivity and hypothyroidism. My body is completely out of whack. This is challenging enough as it is, I don’t need inconsiderate jerks to remind me.

Alright, we know this is an issue and if you are reading my blog, I know you totally understand where I’m coming from with this point. So, how can we help ourselves through this?

1. Slowly back away from people in your life that aren’t supportive. The negativity is draining you emotionally and is impeding your recovery from illness. In order to get through it all, you have to be mentally and physically tough. It will be hard to say good bye at first but I can promise it will be worth it in the long run. Replace those negative nelly’s with people who genuinely care, love and support you unconditionally. This includes a clean sweep on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter etc.

2. Don’t debate people over the issue. There is no point. If they don’t or can’t understand what you are going through, they aren’t going to change their mind after you “educate” them on the disease. It isn’t worth your time or energy.

3. Focus on yourself for a while. It’s ok to miss the parties, happy hour’s and other social events. They will be much more fun once you can get out there healthy and enjoy the time with friends.

4. Follow doctors orders. I struggle with this. I want to be superwoman and heal quick to keep moving at a fast pace. I actually thought I would be able to drive to Pittsburgh to speak today at the Celiac Awareness Tour 3 days after my surgery. Primarily it’s because I am nuts. Sitting in a car for 3.5 hours there and back would have been torture for me. But I thought I would be fine after 1-2 days post operation. Lesson learned on this one!

5. Some of you might get mad at me for saying this but don’t use your illness as an excuse to get out of things all the time. That’s when people get mad at you and when they start thinking your condition isn’t “real” or whatever else they think. Just be honest and truthful with people and they will be much more accepting of your empty seat at the dinner table.

Do you suffer from this? 

How do you stay strong in the presence of non-believers?

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Endometriosis Diagnosis – Now what?

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If you’ve been reading along with my last few posts, you know that I’ve been worried something else is happening in my body other than celiac disease. Well, I finally have some answers.

Yesterday I had a laparascopy procedure done to explore some problems I’ve been having with cramping all the time. I am always terrified to get put to sleep for general anesthesia because there is a battle in my head about not waking up.

“Laparoscopy is a surgery that uses a thin, lighted tube put through a cut (incision) in the belly to look at the abdominal organsor the female pelvic organsLaparoscopy is used to find problems such as cystsadhesionsfibroids, and infection. Tissue samples can be taken for biopsy through the tube (laparoscope).” – Source WebMD

Before I went back in to the test, my doctor came in to talk with me and explain further about the procedure. 30 minutes if there is nothing to find and more like an hour if they have to remove tissue from endometriosis.

My doctor was primarily looking for endometriosis. When I woke up after the exam, I learned it took almost an hour confirming the doctor’s suspicion that I have endometriosis.

So, what is Endometriosis?

“Endometriosis is the growth of endometrial tissue-which normally lines the uterus-in other parts of the body. Endometriosis typically grows in the abdominal cavity and most often attaches to the ovaries, fallopian tubes, outer surface of the uterus, bowels, or other abdominal organs.

Endometriosis growths, called implants or lesions, often bleed during menstruation, causing pain. They may also develop scar tissue (adhesions) that can interfere with an organ’s normal function. Scar tissue can also cause pain and trouble becoming pregnant (infertility).

Endometriosis can be treated with medicines or with surgery to remove implants and scar tissue.”Source WebMD

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My doctor removed tissue found on several different organs so I came out with 4 holes all over my stomach and pubic area from where he entered to scrape the tissue cells. The procedure was pretty easy and after getting home I slept pretty much the rest of the day and night.

Today is day 2 of recovery, and I’m hurting pretty bad. It’s nearly impossible for me to sit up without incredible pain. If I just lay with my body elevated a little, it doesn’t hurt much. Moving seems to be the biggest hurdle right now. Instead of stitches, the openings were glued together. And, I heard from everyone I would have pain in my shoulders from the CO2 but I don’t have that pain at all, so that’s one less thing to be concerned about!

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I want to thank you all for being so incredibly supportive and sending all your love, thoughts and prayers for me during this time. Knowing there are so many people that care and are offering help warms my heart.

I don’t meet up with the doctor again for the next few weeks. No lifting 10 pounds or more for 3-4 weeks. No working out for a minimum of 2-3 weeks and resting for a few days to regain my strength.

After I see the doctor again, I will talk to him about what I am going to do for treatment options. Endometriosis does not have a cure and from what I’m reading can be challenging to treat. I am relieved that it isn’t much more serious like ovarian cancer or other serious reproductive cancers. The doctor also found my bladder to be inflamed and will refer me to a urologist to check to see what’s going on there.

If this is the last piece of the puzzle, I will be elated! I can’t emphasize this enough – LISTEN to your BODY!! If you feel that something is wrong, don’t wait unit its too late. Get help and get treatment. Don’t take no for an answer if your instincts are telling you otherwise.

Had I not switched doctors because I was unhappy with the last one, I probably wouldn’t have found out about the endometriosis this soon and it may have progressed into something much worse.

While I was doing my research, I came upon a study which found a connection between celiac disease and endometriosis. Doesn’t it seem like everything can be linked to celiac disease?

Check out this study:

PURPOSE OF INVESTIGATION:

Celiac disease (CD) involves immunologically mediated intestinal damage with consequent micronutrient malabsorption and varied clinical manifestations, and there is a controversial association with infertility. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of CD in a population of infertile women with endometriosis.

METHODS:

A total of 120 women with a diagnosis of endometriosis confirmed by laparoscopy (study group) and 1,500 healthy female donors aged 18 to 45 years were tested for CD by the determination of IgA-transglutaminase antibody against human tissue transglutaminase (t-TGA) and anti-endomysium (anti-EMA) antibodies.

RESULTS:

Nine of the 120 women in the study group were anti-tTGA positive and five of them were also anti-EMA positive. Four of these five patients were submitted to intestinal biopsy which revealed CD in three cases (2.5% prevalence). The overall CD prevalence among the population control group was 1:136 women (0.66%).

CONCLUSION:

This is the first study reporting the prevalence of CD among women with endometriosis, showing that CD is common in this population group (2.5%) and may be clinically relevant.

F.M. Aguiar et al. Serological testing for celiac disease in women with endometriosis. A pilot study. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2009;36(1):23-5.

I want to make sure those of you who may struggle with cramping throughout the month, severe periods and break through bleeding to get checked asap. There are serious ailments that can be caused by those symptoms. Get it checked before it checks you into something worse. If you have celiac disease, I think it’s fair to say we need to be extra diligent with our heath.

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Do I have celiac diease? Preparation and questions for your first doctor’s appointment.

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So, you’ve read my post about finding a doctor and now you are ready to make your first appointment! Congrats, that is the first step in getting answers for whatever has been plaguing you for years. I am not a medical doctor and do not understand the complexities of testing and diagnosis for celiac disease on the back end, so I am not going to post what type of medical tests you should ask for or have done. I will post links at the bottom of the post from other credible websites for you to review.

Here are my suggestions and tips for getting the most out of your initial doctor’s appointment for gluten intolerance and/or celiac disease.

Before making an appointment:

1. Find out if your doctor actually has experience treating and diagnosing celiac disease or other gluten related problems. There is no point in going to see a doctor who doesn’t specialize or isn’t familiar with these issues. You are just wasting time on getting answers.

2. Ask how long you will have for your first appointment. My doctor allows 30 minutes for a first appointment and 15 for follow ups. Don’t waste your time with the doctor chit chatting!

3. Prior to your appointment, write down all of your symptoms and chronicle your medical history. This will be much easier to show your doctor and review than sitting there trying to think of them all and realizing you didn’t bring up important ones after you already left.

4. Get your medical records from your other doctors sent over to the new one. You will need to sign a medical release of information and might have to pay a fee but it will be worth it for the new doctor to have all your information in one spot.

5. Know and chart your family medical history. Again much easier than trying to remember it all in a 30 minute appointment.

6. Write down every single prescription medication, over the counter medication, supplement and vitamin that you take. Include all the doses and schedule for each of them. Even ones you might be embarrassed you take like an over the counter weight loss pill.

7. Write down why you think you have celiac disease or problems with gluten.

8. DO NOT change anything about your diet or lifestyle prior to going to the doctor and having tests done. This is essential for finding out what is really going on. You have to get an accurate picture of your body condition in order to diagnose.

9. Understand there is no pill or medication for celiac disease if you do in fact have the autoimmune disease. The only way to manage it is with a gluten free diet.

10. Don’t panic or come to your own conclusions prior to going to your appointment. Be educated on your history, your body and yourself to provide the doctor with the exact picture of what is going on. This is the BEST way to get an accurate diagnosis of whatever is upsetting your body.

Questions for your doctor at your first appointment:

1. How do you diagnose celiac disease? What blood tests do you run? Do you test for the celiac genes? Will you want me to get a bowel biopsy? This past year I’ve realized doctors have so many different ideas of diagnosis. I’ve heard one speak about biopies being the only way to tell and others say genetic presence with condition improvement upon removing gluten are just as acceptable. It’s important to understand your doctor’s beliefs and thinking on the diagnosis component.

2. How quickly does you lab turn around results and when can you make your next appointment.

3. Do you provide aftercare, follow up blood tests, recommendations for support groups in the area and additional help?

4. If I don’t have celiac disease, what other conditions could I have with the symptoms I’m experiencing?

5. Can you refer me to a registered dietician specializing in celiac disease?

6. How often will I follow up with you after my original test results?

7. If I have nutrient deficiencies, what is you protocol for treatment?

8. What other tests should be run along with the celiac disease testing?

You know I love your feedback – Post below for others to see if you thought of things I missed!!

Websites for celiac medical tests:

 

http://www.csaceliacs.info/diagnosis_of_celiac_disease.jsp

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/diagnosis

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

 

Social House – Aria Hotel in the Crystals Mall

Social House – Aria Hotel in the Crystals Mall

The restaurant was dark and decorated in red and black colors throughout. It would be a great place for an intimate dinner with a significant other. I would not recommend for families or people with children.

This sushi restaurant was a bit on the pricey end but completely worth every dollar spent!
Imagine my comfort level when our waitress explained she also struggles with a gluten intolerance and was well aware of how to prepare the foods and when to check on items to make sure I was safe.

She answered all my questions about the menu and made me feel extremely safe about eating there. When I had questions she didn’t know the answer, she immediately went back to the kitchen to ask the chef to ensure I was staying gluten free!

I decided to try the most expensive roll in the place – it had gold flakes on it! Kobe beef, king crab and yellow fin were some of the meats in this roll. It tasted like magic. I loved it and every single thing about it was phenomenal. I hadn’t spent a lot of money so far on food during the trip so I decided to take a splurge.

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We also had roasted mini potatoes that were seasoned so perfectly and roasted to the greatest crispiness ever that we were all fighting over them at the table.

Everyone at the table enjoyed different sushi rolls that were each equally delicious in their own way. (or so I was informed by the non-celiacs)

If you are in Las Vegas looking for a unique, delicious dinner and aren’t worried about the price tag – I would highly recommend Social House for dinner.

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Check it out on www.FindMeGlutenFree.com and don’t forget to write your own review!

 

Maggiano’s – Fashion Show Mall

I’ve written about Maggiano’s in the past but wanted to give it another try to see if they are consistent among the chains with gluten free menus and education of their staff.

Sure enough, the waiter was very familiar with gluten free options and provided me with a description about what could and couldn’t be made gluten free. I settled with the pasta dish I always get and it was delicious.

I do struggle with their Caesar salads though. Not sure if it’s the lactose in the dressing or preparation of the salad but I stopped getting them there. –

It was nice to not spend over $25 on a meal for once during this trip.

This chain really does gluten free right!

 

Border Grill Gluten Free Menu
Border Grill Gluten Free Menu

Border Grill – Mandalay Bay

Our last night in Las Vegas, we decided to take a stroll over to Mandalay Bay and have dinner at Border Grill. This place was highly recommended on the gluten free sites and showed on their website to have a dedicated gluten free menu, so needless to say I was pumped to check it out.

The hostess was not very friendly. I gotta say that I am a stickler for happy, positive employees because they are the face of your business and crucial to customer satisfaction.

I was pleased to see such a large gluten free menu until I opened it and realized 2 of the pages were filled with alcohol choices.

We decided to try the Queso Fundido, which they brought out with corn tortillas and the chips are gluten free there. The dip was pretty tasty for sure but it didn’t knock my socks off.

Our waiter was aware of celiac disease and gluten free preparations so that made me feel at ease too during our time there.

I ordered a shrimp and rice which came out on a plate filled with rice and then a strip of shrimp down the middle. The rice was in a pool of liquids making it a bit soggy. I have to say that I can’t stand wet rice so I just ate the rice off the top and picked at the shrimp. The dish was disappointing and I didn’t leave there feeling like I had an amazing gluten free dish coming from somewhere that specifically has a gluten free menu. The cost of my 10 small shrimp and rice was also $28 which I found to be completely out of line for the quality of the dish.

Now, had that dish come out and completely wowed me, I wouldn’t blink at spending $28 on vacation in Las Vegas for dinner. It just didn’t do it for me so I can tell you I won’t likely go back on my trip to Las Vegas next year.

I would recommend Border Grill because they are educated and understand gluten free meals but I’m not sure it would be my first pick for someone. It’s the safe choice.

Have you been here? Make sure you write a review on FindMeGlutenFree.com – I Did!

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Gluten Free Shrimp Meal
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My sister’s gluten free meal

 

Trevi – Forum Shops in Caesar’s Palace

Prior to being diagnosed with celiac disease, this is probably one of my favorite restaurants in Las Vegas. It always provided delicious Italian dishes with a decent price tag and a great atmosphere. I love eating outside the restaurant (but in the mall) on the cobble stone street being able to people watch while enjoying a delicious meal and glass of wine.

We decided to stop there and have an early lunch one day while out shopping around. They do not have a dedicated gluten free menu but they were able to give me several options on the menu that could be prepared gluten free. While the waiter wasn’t as confident about gluten free items, he was able to go back into the kitchen and talk with the chef about choices for me, which made me feel pretty good about eating there.

I decided on a filet and mashed potatoes. It’s probably one of the safest dishes we can eat at a restaurant without getting glutened. The steak was cooked perfectly and the mashed potatoes were delicious. I wouldn’t expect anything less from Trevi.

While they don’t have a dedicated gluten free menu, I feel comfortable in saying that folks who can’t have gluten but are able to explain and ask questions about their meal would be able to safely have dinner there without any problems.

Again make sure you are writing reviews on www.findmeglutenfree.com so we can continue to create a data base of awesome restaurants in every city!